Category: ART

Paintings, Sculptures, photography

Good Friday: Crown of Thorns

Jesus with a crown of thorns, photo by PH Morton

Good Friday: Crown of Thorns

According to Gospels, a woven crown of thorns was forcibly placed on Jesus head prior to his crucifixion.  The crown was a weapon to torture Jesus as well as to mock him.

The above wooden sculpture was a display at the Victoria and Albert museum.  It is carved from oak, made around ca. 1500-1520 by an unknown artist.  This wooden sculpture is big so it is probably a standalone rather than an alter-piece.

Holy Week: Good Friday

Holy Week, photo by PH Morton

Holy Week: Good Friday

God is a pure no-thing

God is a pure no-thing

concealed in now and here:

the less you reach for him,

the more he will appear

~ Angelus Silesius

God is always been with us.  We do not have to look for Him. He is infinity and beyond!

 

The Betrayal of Jesus

The Betrayal of Jesus, by Caravaggio

The Betrayal of Jesus

We saw this painting during a recent sojourn to the National Gallery (London) during a special Caravaggio painting exhibition and influence to other artists.  It is about how he applied light to his work, thereby focusing your eyes to the real subject of his work.  His technique was emulated by other artists after him.

The above painting is about the betrayal of Jesus.  Judas was giving Jesus a kiss, (which has became infamously popular as an idiom, meaning betrayal) to let it be known that the person the authorities/soldiers were after was the one he was kissing.

At the periphery, a man can be seen holding a lamp.  That man is the painter himself, Caravaggio.  Isn’t he clever.  He made it very personal but to the viewers of the painting as well.

We thought, we should highlight this painting being a Maundy Thursday.

A Touch of Ming

Ming Vase

A Touch of Ming

During a recent visit to Victoria and Albert museum, Peter and I were surprised by this rather interactive art appreciation exercise.

Visitors are allowed to touch a huge Ming vase, see above photo.

It said in a note beside it, written in English as well as in Braille, that visitors are allowed to touch it. It was not inside a glass case.

At first Peter and I can’t believe it.  Despite the clear note, we looked around if anyone was looking; we had to make sure that the coast was clear.   We felt that it was rather naughty to touch an antique work of art.  We would have been good candidate for experiment or candid camera, to see our reaction.

The above Ming porcelain vase was an original 1550 antique.

Ming antiques are very much wanted by the rich and famous.  I have often heard that a really rare Ming can set you up for life!

But can you imagine, if we broke the vase, we had to sell up our house to pay for the damage!

I reckon the vase was once broken into several pieces, thus not as valuable or sought after by the moneyed people, ergo hoi polloi are allowed a quick fondle with the Ming!  🙂

 

Snuff Box Head @ V&A

Mask, by PH Morton

Snuff Box Head @ V&A

This is another treasure from the V&A exhibits.

You would not have guessed it that it is a snuff box, a container for ground tobacco.

The lovely intricate design makes it a collectible.  This particular item was made in Chelsea by an unknown artist between 1760-1765.

Dark Vs Light

Sunset, Photo by PH Morton

Dark Vs Light

Thought of the Day:

30 March 2017

We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.
Plato


15 April 2017 (Black Saturday)

If a man
wishes to be sure
of the road he travels on,
he must close his eyes
and walk in the dark.
Saint John of the Cross