Category: Photography

Holy Week: Good Friday

Holy Week, photo by PH Morton

Holy Week: Good Friday

God is a pure no-thing

God is a pure no-thing

concealed in now and here:

the less you reach for him,

the more he will appear

~ Angelus Silesius

God is always been with us.  We do not have to look for Him. He is infinity and beyond!

 

Snuff Box Head @ V&A

Mask, by PH Morton

Snuff Box Head @ V&A

This is another treasure from the V&A exhibits.

You would not have guessed it that it is a snuff box, a container for ground tobacco.

The lovely intricate design makes it a collectible.  This particular item was made in Chelsea by an unknown artist between 1760-1765.

Dark Vs Light

Sunset, Photo by PH Morton

Dark Vs Light

Thought of the Day:

30 March 2017

We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.
Plato


15 April 2017 (Black Saturday)

If a man
wishes to be sure
of the road he travels on,
he must close his eyes
and walk in the dark.
Saint John of the Cross

Masks

 

Masks, photo by PH Morton

Masks

#1 Noh Mask

#2 Zo-Onna Mask

#3 Hannya Mask, represents a female demon

#4 Hanakobu Akujo

#5 Uba

These masks can be currently and readily admired at the V&A Museum, East Asian gallery.

Masks are used for protection, disguise, performance and entertainment.

The above masks were Japanese and were sculpted from wood.  They were based from the 14th century classical Japanese theatre called Noh which was much loved and patronised by the Shogun, supreme military leader.

The Age of Innocence

Age of Innocence, V&A, photo by JMorton

The Age of Innocence

The above marble sculpture of a young girl was by Alfred Drury.  It was signed and dated in 1897. Apparently it was first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1897.  It is now housed at the Victoria & Albert Museum. The young model for this work was Grace Doncaster, who was a daughter of one of Drury’s friend.

I was very taken with the facial feature of this bust.  The girl has such a sweet innocence about her.  Her plump cheeks and rounded chin are so lifelike!

Snuff Bottle – Qing Dynasty

Snuff Bottle, V&A Museum, photo by JMorton

Snuff Bottle – Qing Dynasty

The above object caught my attention immediately, not only because it was exquisitely beautiful but I remember I have a similar one at home, which Peter got me as a gift a couple of years ago.

I thought it was a perfume bottle.  It was only during a visit to the Victoria & Albert Museum two days ago that I learnt it was a snuff bottle, which was used during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912).

Smoking a tobacco was prohibited during the Qing Dynasty, therefore nicotine loving Chinese and Mongolian people had resorted to sniffing powdered tobacco contained in snuff bottles.  Inhaling finely ground tobacco was allowed as consumption was deemed medicinal at that time.

The snuff bottles were constructed as tactile as possible as they are carried by hand replacing the snuff boxes favoured by Europeans.  There were really beautiful, work of art, snuff bottles as they were a symbol of your position, how high up you were in society.  Sharing a snuff during the 16th century China was a form of greetings.

Wonderful to learn new things.  I now know that my ‘perfume bottle’ is actually a snuff bottle.  Where is the tobacco?!!! 🙂

Prawns Vs Shrimp

Shrimps, photo by PH Morton

Prawns Vs Shrimp

Having grown up in the Philippines, we call these delicious crustaceans as shrimps rather than prawns.  Apparently prawns is the term used in the UK and Australia while in the USofA they tend to use the term shrimps.

I further found out that both the words: prawns and shrimps are English in origin.  The prawns are supposed to be larger than the shrimps. But to really tell a prawn from a shrimp is to look at their legs.  The first three pairs of legs in prawns have pincers while in shrimps, only the first two pairs are claw-like.

Well I don’t think I would be really bothered whether I was eating a prawn or a shrimp as they are both manna from heaven. They are both a cause for taste-buds jubilation. 😉