Category: Photo by PH Morton

Masks

 

Masks, photo by PH Morton

Masks

#1 Noh Mask

#2 Zo-Onna Mask

#3 Hannya Mask, represents a female demon

#4 Hanakobu Akujo

#5 Uba

These masks can be currently and readily admired at the V&A Museum, East Asian gallery.

Masks are used for protection, disguise, performance and entertainment.

The above masks were Japanese and were sculpted from wood.  They were based from the 14th century classical Japanese theatre called Noh which was much loved and patronised by the Shogun, supreme military leader.

Prawns Vs Shrimp

Shrimps, photo by PH Morton

Prawns Vs Shrimp

Having grown up in the Philippines, we call these delicious crustaceans as shrimps rather than prawns.  Apparently prawns is the term used in the UK and Australia while in the USofA they tend to use the term shrimps.

I further found out that both the words: prawns and shrimps are English in origin.  The prawns are supposed to be larger than the shrimps. But to really tell a prawn from a shrimp is to look at their legs.  The first three pairs of legs in prawns have pincers while in shrimps, only the first two pairs are claw-like.

Well I don’t think I would be really bothered whether I was eating a prawn or a shrimp as they are both manna from heaven. They are both a cause for taste-buds jubilation. 😉

Pakam – Bulacan Recipe

Chicken pieces, Photo by PH Morton

Pakam – Bulacan Recipe

 

Pakam apparently is a very old recipe which is almost unique to Bulacan, a region in the Philippines which is north of Manila.

I love chicken!  I eat the meat almost everyday. Therefore a new recipe is always welcome. 🙂

Pakam Recipe:

Ingredients:

1 chicken, cut at the joints
1 tbsp salt
2 tbsp butter or margarine (or even lard if easily available)
2 onions, sliced
1 tbsp fish sauce (patis)
2-3 radishes, peeled and sliced
1/2 cup vinegar
1/2 tsp black pepper
3 cloves garlic, minced
3 ripe tomatoes chopped
1 cup water

Method of preparation:

Arrange the chicken pieces into a large casserole pan.

Add the vinegar, salt and pepper and cook until the liquid had evaporated.

Deboned the chicken and cut into bite size pieces.

Using a large frying pan, add the butter and to it saute the garlic and when brown (not burnt) put in the onions, tomatoes and fish sauce.  Also add the chicken pieces.

Let it cook for a couple of minutes before adding the water.

Bring the water into a  boil.  Add the radishes and continue cooking until the radishes are soft and tender but not mushy.

Enjoy this piquant tasting dish with some beer or go Korean with some Soju!

Yum!

 

Oysters a la Guisado

Philippine oysters, photo by PH Morton

Philippine oysters, photo by PH Morton

Oysters a la Guisado

 

It is Valentine’s Day tomorrow.  It is love day.  For total romance, why not cook the love one an aphrodisiac of taste and texture.

The ingredients:

1 tsp chopped garlic
1 large onion, peeled and sliced
2 large tomatoes, chopped
2 tbsp olive oil, extra virgin or not 🙂
2 cups cleaned and shelled oysters
Salt and pepper to taste

Method of preparation:

Using large frying pan, heat the oil and saute the garlic until golden brown and fragrant.  Don’t burn as  it will leave a bitter taste.

Add the onion and saute until translucent, add the tomatoes and cook for 3-5 minutes.

Add the oysters and leave to simmer for a few minutes.

Season with salt and freshly grown black pepper.

Serve with buttered sliced baguette.

Enjoy.

Big Ben, Clock Tower, Elizabeth Tower

Elizabeth Tower and the Parliament Bldg, photo by PH Morton

Elizabeth Tower, photo by PH Morton

Big Ben, Clock Tower, Elizabeth Tower

Elizabeth Tower was formerly known as the Clock Tower.  It is part of the imposing, one of the most famous landmark of London, the Palace of Westminster.

The tower is often identified by a  misnomer, Big Ben.  In actuality, Big Ben is the huge 13 tonnes Great Bell located at the top of the 360 feet high tower.  The four-face clock became operational on 7 September, 1859.

The Clock Tower has been renamed as Elizabeth Tower in 2012 to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II.

 

 

Happy Chinese New Year 2017 – Fire Rooster Year

Fire Rooster, Photo by PH Morton

Happy Chinese New Year 2017 – Fire Rooster Year

Rooster, photo by PH Morton

Rooster, photo by PH Morton

To everyone, let us wish you a Happy Chinese New Year.

Kung Hei Fat Choi

2017 is the year of the Fire Rooster.

The fire rooster symbolises fidelity and punctuality.  I can understand the latter one as rooster will cock-o-doodle-do at the crack of dawn serving as an alarm clock to early risers especially farmers and field workers.

We used to keep roosters and chicken in our farm in Marag.  As peacocks, they are really stunning lookers compared to the hens.

Who are the roosters?

They are those born in 1933, 1945, 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, 2005, 2015, 2029 (Year of the Rooster comes every 12 years)

Have a piri-piri chicken. We hope this New Year is full of trips to KFC, Jollibee and McDo and have a lovely chickenjoy! 🙂 🙂 😉

Happy New Year!