Category: Comfort Food

Pancit Bihon Recipe

Pancit Bihon

Pancit Bihon Recipe

 

Ingredients:

2½ lbs Bijon noodles
1 cup sliced pork
1/2 cup shelled shrimps
3 cups vegetable broth (or 2 vegetable bouillon cubes dissolved in 3 cups of hot water)
1 large onion, chopped roughly
8 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 slabs tokwa (tofu), cut in fairly large cubes
1 large carrot, peeled and cut into long strips
100 g string beans, topped and tailed and cut in 2 inches length
1 small napa cabbage, sliced
1 red bell pepper, sliced
3 tbsp vegetable oil
2-3 tbsp dark soy sause
1 tbsp fish sauce
Freshly ground black pepper

Method of Preparaton:

Heat the oil using a wok..

Stir fry the pork until golden all over.   Add the tokwa (tofu) and brown all over.  Remove both pork and tokwa from the wok and set aside.

Saute the garlic and onions in the wok until deliciously fragrant.  Add the shelled shrimps.

Return the pork and tokwa back into the wok.

Pour in the vegetable broth, cover to cook for 8-10 minutes.

Drop in the string beans, carrot, cabbage and bell pepper.

Bring to a boil, then add the bijon noodles (pull the ‘nest’ apart as you drop the strand into the wok).

Pour in the fish sauce and season with the soy sauce.  Do not all the soy sauce all at once.  Do a taste test.  If two tablespoon is enough according to your taste then that should be enough 🙂

sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.

Cover the wok with a suitable lid and simmer until the bijon is cooked.

Enjoy!  Delicious afternoon tea time snack!  A merienda a la Filipino!

Tuyo – [Genus Sardinella]

Tuyo, photo by PH Morton

Tuyo – [Genus Sardinella]

Tuyo and eggs, photo by Bess Mercado

Times had changed, it certainly had.

Once upon a time, tuyo is food for the poor.  And many a television dramas had been made of poor families often grumbling about having tuyo again for every breakfast.  Only the poor ate it, tuyo was very inexpensive then.

These dramas influenced me.  There was a time when I would have fainted if my mother had offered to feed me tuyo when I was in my teens.  🙂 🙂 🙂 LOL

She remembered that time too, because when I went back home after so many years living in London, I requested fried tuyo with sinagag (garlic fried rice) for breakfast.

“Since when do you eat tuyo?” my mother asked me.

“he he he … from now!”

And I made good of that statement.  For some reason, I missed tuyo whilst in London.

Almost everyday of a month-long stay in the Philippines, I had fried tuyo for breakfast.  I just love it.

Apparently tuyo had cross-over the social divide in the Philippines.  Even the elite had taken to dining on tuyo, perhaps better presented in a silver platter! 🙂

Tuyo has a very distinctive smell.  It is rather pungent.  If you are frying it, the whole neighourhood would know! If you were the cook, you would smell of it and if you had eaten it, well you have to brush your teeth thoroughly.

Tuyo are sardines which are salted and dried.

It is so easy to cook it.  Just fry both sides until crispy.

Best eaten with runny fried eggs and tonnes of fried rice.

Sarap.

Tamagoyaki Recipe

Tamagoyaki, photo by Carol Elep

Tamagoyaki Recipe

Tamagoyaki is a Japanese egg roll.  It is pretty easy to make with practice.  This is just like the Korean egg roll.

Below is a recipe from www.japanese101, where a video of how to make it is easily available.

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp Mirin (or 1/4 tsp sugar)
  • 1 tsp oil

Instructions

  1. Mix eggs, salt, soy sauce and Mirin in a bowl.
  2. Heat a pan at medium high temperature and add oil. (A rectangular Tamagoyaki pan is best, but a round pan can work as well.)
  3. Pour a thin layer of egg mixture in the pan, tilting to cover the bottom of the pan. After the thin egg has set a little, gently roll into a log. Start to roll when the bottom of the egg has set and there is still liquid on top. If you let the egg cook too much, it will not stick as you roll the log. Now you have a log at one end of the pan. Pour some more egg mixture to again cover the bottom of the pan, with the roll of egg at the end. After the new layer has set, roll the log back onto the the cooked thin egg and roll to the other end of the pan.
  4. Repeat adding egg to the pan and rolling back and forth until the egg is used up.
  5. Remove from the pan and cool for 3-4 minutes.
  6. Slice the ends of the log off and then slice the log into 1/2″ pieces. You should see a nice spiral pattern in the cross section of the egg.