Category: Shellfish

Pork & Shrimp in Coconut Milk

Pork & Shrimp in Coconut Milk, photo by Mae Sanguer

Pork & Shrimp in Coconut Milk

Ingredients

  • 1½ lbs. pork, cubed
  • 1 lb shrimps, shell removed
  • 2 cups vegetable broth (or 2 vegetable bouillon cubes dissolved in 2 cup of hot water; plain hot water will also do)
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • ¼ cup shrimp paste (bagoong na alamang – can be bought at any oriental food store if living in the UK)
  • 1 small squash, peeled and cubed
  • 200g  string beans, cut into 2 inch pieces
  • 1 medium  onion, sliced
  • 4-6 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • 3 tbsp vegetable  oil
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • Salt to taste

Method of Preparation:

  1. Heat the oil using a casserole pan or a wok.
  2. Saute the garlic until fragrant and golden, do not burn as it would leave a bitter taste.
  3. Add the onion and cook until translucent.
  4. Stir in the pork. Cook the pork is ssizzling in its juice and oil.
  5. Sprinkle the ground black pepper.
  6. Carefully pour in the vegetable broth. Bring it to a boil.  Then lower down the heat and leave to simmer for 10 minutes.
  7. Add the coconut milk. Bring it to a boil and leave to simmer until the pork is tender.
  8. Stir in the squash and cook for 10 minutes.
  9. Season with the shrimp paste. Stir thoroughly.
  10. Add the string beans and shrimp. Cover and cook for 3 to 5 minutes. Add salt only if needed.
  11. Transfer to a serving plate.
  12. Serve with freshly boiled rice.

Shrimp Adobo with Coconut Milk,

Shrimp Adobo with Coconut Milk, photo by Mae Sanguer

Shrimp Adobo with Coconut Milk

This recipe is another much loved variation to the adobo.  This recipe used shrimp and the addition of gata (coconut milk).

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons oil
6 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 tablespoons pepper, ground
1 kilogram shrimp, shells intact
200g mange tout, topped and tailed (trimmed)
1/2 cup vinegar
1/4 cup soy sauce
350 ml coconut milk (gata)

COOKING PROCEDURE

Heat the oil in a wok or a frying pan and saute the garlic.

Add the shrimp and cook until it turned pinkish.

Stir in the mange tout.

Pour in the vinegar and soy sauce.

Add the ground pepper.

Let it simmer for a minute.

Tip in the coconut milk and let it simmer until thickened.

Serve hot with freshly boiled rice.

Itadakimasu….

Seafood in Coconut Milk

Seafood Ginataan, photo by Cristy Miclat

Seafood in Coconut Milk

A little spice in coconut milk like the addition of chillies makes it absolutely delicious.  The chilli enhances that creaminess to the coconut milk.  The one drawback is that you will eat more rice with it.  You’ll just have to watch your diet during the next meal!  🙂

Ingredients:

1 tilapia, cleaned, gutted and scales removed and then grilled on charcoal or over your cooking stove.

1 cup mussels

2 squids, cut into rigs

1 cup shrimps

half a squash, peeled and cut into cubes

1 cup green beans (sitaw)

3 cups coconut milk

3 gloves garlic, shopped finely

2 tsp shrimp paste (bagoong alamang) (use salt instead, amount is according to taste)

1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper (use mortar and pestle to grind)

1 medium onion, chopped roughly

3 long chillis

1½ tbsp vegetable oil

Instructions

  1. Heat a large casserole pan or wok.
  2. Add the oil and then saute the garlic until golden and fragrant (do not burn).
  3. Quickly add the onions and stir fry until translucent.
  4. Pour-in coconut milk, stir, and bring to a boil.
  5. Add the squash (kalabasa) and green beans (sitaw).
  6. Sprinkle ground black pepper; add the chillies.
  7. Season with shrimp paste or salt.
  8. Carefully drop in the grilled tilapia, mussels, shrimps and squid and cook for 3 to 5 minutes.
  9. Gently transfer to  a serving dish and impressed the family and guests with this masterpiece of taste and texture.

Enjoy!

Garlic Shrimps Recipe

Garlic Shrimps, by Arnold Gamboa

Garlic Shrimps Recipe

 

2 tbsp olive olive oil

1 tbsp vegetable oil

a knob of butter

1 kg large shrimp or prawns, deveined, shell removed except for the tail ends

2 heads of garlic, peeled and chopped roughly

2 tsp. salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Method of preparation:

Quickly pat with a paper kitchen towel each of the large prawns.  Set aside while heating a wok.

Add the olive oil and a teaspoon of chopped garlic.

Stir fry the shrimps over a medium heat.  Do not overcook.  As soon as they turn pink, remove from the wok.

Using the same wok add the vegetable oil and a small knob of butter.

Stir in the rest of the garlic.  Cook until just golden brown (do not burn).

Return the shrimp, season with salt and ground black pepper.

Toss well.

Serve this utterly fragrant and delicious shrimp to waiting guests and diners.

 

Spaghetti with Shrimp Pesto

Spaghetti in Shrimp Pesto, Photo by Arnold Gamboa

Spaghetti with Shrimp Pesto

 The above photo was taken by Arnold Gamboa, a former child matinee idol of the late 70s in the Philippines.
  • 500g Spaghetti (dried or fresh)
  • ½ lb shrimp/prawn, peeled, deveined and tailed off
  • ¾ – 1 CUP PESTO SAUCE
  • ½ lemon, juiced
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced or chopped finely
  • 2 tbsp grated parmesan cheese

    ———————————————-

    Fresh Pesto Recipe

    Ingredients

  • 50g pine nuts
  • 80g basil
  • 50g Parmesan
  • 150ml olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves

    Method

    1. Heat a small frying pan over a low heat. Dry fry the pine nuts until golden.
    2. Put the pine nuts into a food processor together with the remaining ingredients and process until smooth.
    3. Pour the pesto into a jar and cover with a little extra oil, then seal and store in the fridge. It will keep in a fridge for a good couple of weeks.

    —————————————————-

    Instructions

    Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add a pinch of salt and a teaspoon of olive oil and cook spaghetti according to the packet’s instruction.

    No 1 way:  Drain and arrange over a large serving plate as above photo. (then top with the pesto and shrimp)

    No 2 way is to return the pasta back into the pan, adding the pesto and 25g of parmesan. Toss well, then transfer to a serving plate and sprinkle with the rest of the Parmesan. Then arrange cooked shrimps on top.

    Concurrently, heat a saucepan, add the olive oil, minced garlic, shrimp and sprinkle with the lemon juice. Stir until shrimps are opaquely reddish.  This might take about 5 minutes.

    Once shrimp are fully cooked, add the pesto and stir well.  Use as topping for no 1 way.

    Serve immediately.

    PS  No1 or No2 only differs on how you want to present the dish, both taste the same. 🙂

Sautéed Green Beans With Shrimps

Green Beans , photo by Rosie Reyes- Barrera

Sautéed Green Beans With Shrimps

This recipe is as easy as ABC.  It is a quick stir-fry for maximum taste and goodness.

Ingredients

  • 150g shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 300g string beans, cut into 2 inches length
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 2 ripe tomatoes, chopped finely
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  •  2 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Heat the vegetable oil with the olive oil in a wok or large frying pan over fairly high heat.
  2. Saute the onion, tomatoes, and garlic. (onion, tomato and garlic are the trinity ingredients of Filipino saute. 🙂 )
  3. Once the onion turns soft and the tomatoes mushy, add the shrimp and stir fry for 2 – 3 minutes.
  4. Add the string beans and soy sauce. Continue to stir fry for 5 minutes.
  5. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Enjoy with a freshly boiled or fried rice.

Soft Shell Crab Tempura

Soft Shell Crab Tempura, by Arnold Gamboa

Soft Shell Crab Tempura

Soft shell crabs are just the normal typical everyday edible crab.  In a life of a crab, it undergoes some sort of moulting where it sheds its old tough tight casing and develop a new one to grow into. The new casing  is soft and this is when the is crab taken into the kitchen to delight the tastebuds of the gourmets for a soft shell crab

Ingredients

  • 2 soft-shell crabs
  • 85 g  plain flour
  • 1/2 salt
  • 1/2 sugar
  • 200 ml carbonated/sparkling water, chilled
  • Panko bread crumbs
  • oil for deep-frying

Method of Preparation:

Make up the tempura batter by mixing the flour with the salt and sugar.  Gradually add the chilled sparkling water.  Stir until there are no lumps.  Don’t go on stirring and daydream. 🙂 Note: over stirring will create gluten, which will make the batter stodgy.

Using a large platter, spread the panko bread crumbs.

Power up the deep fryer and heat the oil to 180ºC

Dip the crab into the tempura batter, ensuring all parts are covered.

Roll in the crab into the platter of panko bread crumbs. Cover every nook and cranny. 🙂

Shake gently and drop the crab into a deep fryer and let it sizzle until crispy all over.  This should take about 3-4 minutes.

Carefully fish out the crab and let it cool over some kitchen paper towels, which will absorb excess oil.

Repeat procedure with the next crab.

Enjoy with some green salad.

🙂

Ginataang Kuhol (Escargot in Coconut Milk)

Escargot in Coconut Milk, Photo by Rosie Reyes-Barrera

Ginataang Kuhol (Escargot in Coconut Milk)

I love and miss eating snails!  That doesn’t sound right!  That sounded too full-on with too much yucky factor 🙂 .  I think I would call it with the more exotic French word for snail, escargot, instead.

When I was a young girl living in Marag, we used to eat a lot of escargots, which are called bisukol in Ilocano `(and kuhol in Tagalog).

My memories of bisukol (escargot) is deeply embedded into my happy family nostalgia.  Eating these little critters bring back memories of strong family bonding.

In our province of Marag in Kalinga-Apayao, Philippines, dining with bisukol involves both hand and arms actions.  To prepare the bisukol, prior to cooking, get a fairly heavy ladle or metal spoon and tap to break the bottom of each snail.  This will allow the snail flesh to come out easily.  And the most fun way of eating a bisukol is to pick one up with your right hand ensuring that the snail opening is facing down onto your plate, then banging your right wrist into your slightly extended left wrist a la Psy Gangnam Style (the horsey bit) until the snail meat comes out and drops on your plate.  It was very satisfying watching everyone doing the arm action at the dining table.  LOL

In the West, every paraphernalia seems to be available for most food, exotic or otherwise.  Like with escargot, when eaten in fine restaurant, you will get a snail tong (like the ones with Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman) and a two-prong snail fork.

Snail fork or arms action, escargot is exotically delicious!  Below is a very satisfying recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs escargot (kuhol)
  • 3 cups coconut milk
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • 2 tablespoon ginger, cut into fine strips
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 tbsp shrimp paste (1½ tbsp fish sauce)
  • 2 green long chilli pepper
  • Kangkong leaves (Swamp cabbage/ water spinach), cut and trimmed into manageable size for comfortable dining 😉
  • Salt & pepper to taste
Cooking procedure:
  1. Tap each of the snails’ bottom to break, then wash the escargot thoroughly, removing all the grits.  Did you know if you live in the UK, those pesky snails in your garden are edible.  According to Gordon Ramsey,  intrepid gourmets can go to the garden to gather up the snails. As an added bonus, these wild garden snails taste far better than those which are farmed.  However you cannot just put garden snails directly to the pot and eat them.  There are steps to be taken first for health, taste and safety reasons.  First leave the snails watered but without food for two days to get rid of any toxin they might have ingested.  On the third day, give them carrots; watch their droppings.  If they start to poop orange substance, wash them again and put them in a sealed container into your fridge.  when they are soporific, they are ready to cook.  Thank goodness you can get snails, which have been purge and ready to cook.
  2. Heat up the cooking oil in a large pan or better yet a wok (kawali),
  3. Saute the garlic, onion  and ginger.
  4. Drop in the escargots followed by the coconut milk.
  5. Bring to a boil and then lower down the heat and continue to simmer until the coconut milk turns slightly creamy.
  6. Stir in the shrimp paste or fish sauce.
  7.  Add the Long chilli peppers and Kangkong ( water spinach) and simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. Check and adjust the seasoning by adding more fish sauce or salt and pepper if needed.
  9. Serve with freshly boiled or steamed rice.  Arm wrestle your way to a delicious escargot.  It is fun.

Oysters in Half Shell with Mignonette Sauce

 

Oysters, photo by JMorton

Oysters in Half Shell with Mignonette Sauce

Peter and I had a lovely time shopping and dining at Fortnum & Mason.  We can greatly recommend Fortnum & Mason’s The Wine Bar as a great venue for freshly shucked oysters.  See above photos.  It is fine dining at its best!

Ingredients:

6-12 oysters , 3-6 oysters each
lemon juice

For the Mignonette Sauce

  • ⅔ cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons finely diced shallot
  • 2 teaspoons, freshly ground black pepper

Make up the sauce by combining the vinegar, shallot and black pepper together in a clear glass and refrigerate to chill for at least an hour.

The preparation of this delicious recipe was from Jamie Oliver’s Recipe blog. Jamie gave a detailed description on how to choose, clean and prepare oysters, which can apparently be difficult if proper tools are not used. 🙂

Method

Oysters are probably the best-known aphrodisiac and, although they aren’t everybody’s cup of tea, I love them! They’re available year-round, but the best time to eat them is in the depths of winter when the ocean is icy cold and they are plump and juicy. British oysters are fantastic and great value. There are two main types available – rock oysters and native oysters. Both of these would make a great starter to a romantic dinner.

When you buy them, make sure that they are tightly closed and heavy in the hand. Ideally, oysters should be straight out of the sea when you eat them. Give them a rinse in cold water before you start preparing them – this can be tricky so please be very careful!

To open them, you’ll need an oyster knife which is short, thick and quite blunt. Do not use a normal kitchen knife! It’s dangerous and you’ll probably snap the tip of the knife off. A screwdriver is probably a better bet if you don’t have an oyster knife.

Hold the oyster curved-side down on a chopping board with a folded kitchen cloth between the shell and your hand. This is to help you get a good grip and protect your hand.

Look for the hinge between the top shell and the bottom shell, and poke the knife tip into the crack. You need to push quite hard and work it in there but eventually you should be able to prise the top shell off. It’s not always that easy so it might be a good idea to try a few before dinner to get the hang of it. Wear an apron too in case you get a bit dirty.

When you get the oyster open, throw away the top shell. If there is any seawater in the bottom shell with the oyster, try and keep it in there. Pick out any fragments of shell and place the oyster on a plate with a mound of rock salt or crushed ice in the middle.

Season it however you like, then tip that lovely fresh oyster into your mouth!