Category: Postulant Cook Does …

Sautéed Marrow & Minced Beef (Ginisang Patola & Giniling na Baka)

marrow minced pork

Sautéed Marrow & Minced Beef (Ginisang Patola & Giniling na Baka)

The trinity for sauteeing in the Philippines is the combination of garlic, onion and tomatoes.  With these three ingredients many a food are cooked to perfection and one of these recipes, also a great favourite is marrow with minced beef.
Having said that, in this recipe minced beef can be substituted with minced pork, minced lamb, minced chicken or oven minced turkey.  But I prefer beef or pork 🙂

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, minced finely
  • 1 large tomato, chopped
  • 1 onion, peeled & chopped
  • 500 g minced beef
  • I large marrow or two large courgettes, peeled, inner sack of seeds removed, then sliced as per photo above
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce or 1 tsp salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Using a wok or a large frying pan, heat the oil over medium heat.
  2. Add the garlic and onion and stir fry for a minute.
  3. Then add the tomato and sauté for a further 3 minutes until tomato had softened.
  4. Stir in the minced beef and cook until it has brown.
  5. Mix in the in the marrow slices, then add the water.
  6. Add the fish sauce.
  7. Turn down the heat slightly and leave to simmer for five minutes.
  8. Check the seasoning.  Add more fish sauce or salt if required.

Delicious with freshly boiled rice.

Yummy

Max’s Fried Chicken Recipe

Max’s Signature Chicken, photo by JMorton

Max’s Fried Chicken Recipe

During a recent holiday in the Philippines, we visited Max’s Restaurant a lot as we were staying in a hotel nearby.

I have to say, Max’s fried chicken is really something.  It is soft and moist in the inside and it is crispy at the outside.  Simply tasty.  If you happened to go to the Philippines, be sure to try one of Max’s chicken. 🙂

I thought since we eat a lot of chicken in the UK, how can I make it taste like Max’s?!!!

So I trawled the internet and this is the recipe that I got.

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium size whole corn-fed or organic chicken
  • 4  dried bay leaves
  • 2 heaped tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 large onion, peeled and quartered
  • 2 cloves, garlic, minced finely
  • 5 cups water
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • oil
Instructions
  1. Use a large steamer; if the steamer is not large enough to contain the whole chicken then cut the chicken in half.
  2. Add the water to the steamer and bring to a boil.
  3. Drop in the bay leaves and chopped parsley into the boiling water
  4. Arrange the chicken into the steamer and cook for 50 minutes.
  5. Take out the chicken from the steamer to let any excess liquid drip out.  Set it aside for half an hour.
  6. Rub minced garlic, salt and pepper all over the chicken and the inside cavities.
  7. In a deep-fryer or large casserole pan, heat the cooking oil.
  8. Deep-fry the chicken.  If the oil does not cover the whole chicken, carefully turn the chicken round until it is golden all over.
  9. Remove the chicken and let it drip and cool down a little.
  10. Serve hot with gravy or choice of sauces.

 

Oxtail Soup Recipe

Oxtail Soup, photo by JMorton

Oxtail Soup Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1.25kg/2lb 12oz oxtail, trimmed of fat and cut into pieces
  • 1 onion, roughly chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, roughly chopped
  • 1 large carrot, roughly chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 thyme sprigs
  • 10 black peppercorns
  • 2 tsp tomato purée
  • 300ml/10½fl oz red wine
  • 1.5 litres/2½ pints litres beef stock
  • 1 tbsp plain flour

Mango Juice Easy Recipe

Mango Juice, iphone photo by JMorton

Mango Juice Easy Recipe

We had copious amount of mango juice whilst in the Philippines.  Philippines is the best place for mango made recipes, including mango juice because of our species of mango called the carabao, which is the sweetest fruit when ripen.

Thank goodness, mangoes are now widely available everywhere and almost all year round.  But as it is summer, they can be bought cheaply in boxes.  The flesh are like ambrosia but if you wanted to make it into a refreshing juice we have the recipe below.

Ingredients:

  • 2 ripe mangoes
  • 1/2 cup cold water
  • 1/2 cup ice-cubes

Method of preparation:

The easiest way is to use a blender.

Cut the mango in half and then scoop out the flesh from the skin and around the seed/stone.

Transfer the delicious ripe flesh into a blender, pour in the water and ice cubes.

Blitz until smooth.

Poor into glasses and enjoy!

hmmmmmm

 

Chateaubriand Steak

 

Chateaubriand Steak

Chateaubriand is a thick cut fillet steak.  Usual method of preparation is grilling the meat and then generously topped with Bearnaise sauce.

It was a recipe by the chef of the Vicomte de Chateaubriand, Francois Rene, in 1822.

The Modern Recipe:

Ingredients

  • Sauce:
  • 1 oz shallots
  • 1 sprig thyme
  • 1/2 bay leaf
  • 1 oz chopped mushrooms
  • 1/4 pint white wine
  • 1/2 pint veal stock
  • 4 oz maitre d hotel butter
  • Chateaubriand Steak
  • This steak comes from the centre of the fillet. It is difficult to state it’s exact weight , because it depends so much on the thickness of the fillet, but one weighing about 12 oz to 1 lb is about right.
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • salt
  • melted butter
  • olive oil

Method

  1. Wipe the steak with kitchen towel and bash it a couple of times on each side with a meat bat. Season generously with freshly ground black pepper and put to one side to come to room temperature.
  2. Put the shallots, thyme, bay leaf, mushrooms and wine into a pan and reduce almost entirely. Add the stock and reduce again until there is about 1/4 pt left. Strain and whisk in the maitre d hotel butter until the sauce thickens. Put the sauce in a bowl over warm water until ready to serve.
  3. Season the steak with salt and brush it generously with melted butter and olive oil. Brush the grill grid with oil before placing the steak on it and grill 9 mins each side for rare, 11 mins medium and 12 mins well done.
  4. Cut the cooked steak on a carving board and carve it at a slight angle with a very sharp knife into about 6 slices (depending on the size of the steak). Serve with the Chateaubriand sauce handed round separately.
  5. Goes well with watercress and roast potatoes sprinkled with fresh herbs
  6. Cheats sauce. You can speed the whole thing up by using a can of good quality consomme, a chicken stock cube, 4oz butter, 1 tbs finely chopped parsley, 1 tbs lemon juice, salt, black pepper and a pinch of cayenne pepper. Reduce and serve with the steak as above.

Wonton Mami Soup Recipe

Wanton Noodle Soup, photo by JMorton

Wonton Mami Soup Recipe

This soup is delicious and just the business when you are not feeling too well.  Ask someone to kindly make this for you and in no time, you will be feeling rejuvenated!  🙂

Ingredients:

 

For the wonton:

  • 1lb ground pork
  • 6 oz, finely chopped shrimps
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • 1 tsp dark soy sauce
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped spring onions
  • 16 wonton wrappers

How to make the wonton:

  • Using a large bowl, mix together the  ground pork with the chopped shrimps, garlic, soy sauce, salt and spring onions. Stir well until combined together.
  • Divide and spoon in the meat mix into the middle of each of the16 wonton wrappers.
  • Do not overload the wrappers as the edges need to be gathered together to fully enclosed the meat, like a parcel.

For the Mami Noodle Soup:

  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced finely
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and sliced thinly
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • salt and pepper according to taste
  • 1 tablespoon shaoxing wine
  • half a napa cabbage, shredded roughly
  • 12 oz. egg noodles
  • 8 cups high quality chicken broth (or 4 chicken bouillon dissolved in 8 cups of hot water)

Method of preparation:

Using a large casserole pan, heat the oil and then add the garlic and onion and stir until fragrant and the onion translucent.  Do not burn the garlic to prevent any bitter after taste.

Pour in the chicken broth and bring to a boil.  Stir in the sugar and the shaoxing wine.

Add the wonton and allow to simmer for 3 minutes.  Drop in the noodles and continue simmering for 5 more minutes or until the noodles have soften.

Season with salt and pepper.

Add the napa cabbage.

Simmer for another minute.

Now bring in the serving bowl and share this delicious one dish meal!

Camote Cue (Caramelised Sweet Potato)

Camote Cue, photo by JMorton

Camote Cue (Caramelised Sweet Potato)

When it was merienda time (2-3pm snack time) in the Philippines, we used to queue up for the still frying caramelised sweet potato in one of the street vendors in Tondo, Manila.  It was hypnotic to watch the bubbling cooking oil as it cooks the camote.  We then had to watch how each circular slice was threaded into a wooden skewer.

This 2017 holiday in Manila, we had camote cue for snack and was surprised to be given elongated shapes sans the kebab stick.  It tasted the same but I have to admit, I miss the way you take a bite from a slice of camote from the stick.

Anyway below is a simple recipe for this delicious snack, much loved by Filipinos.

Ingredients

  • 2 sweet potato, peeled and sliced
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup cooking oil
  • wooden skewer

Instructions

  1. Heat a wok or a large pan and pour the cooking oil.
  2. Carefully heat the cooking oil and then stir in the sugar.
  3. When the sugar is heated up, it begins to break down and float up.  Now add the slices of sweet potatoes.
  4. Fry each side for 7-10 minutes, allowing it to be covered with the caramelised sugar.
  5. Remove the sweet potatoes with slotted spoon from the wok and using a tong directly thread the caramelised sweet potatoes in a wooden skewer, usually three pieces in each skewer.
  6. Share and Enjoy.

Note:  Be careful in cooking this recipe.  Bubbling oil and boiling sugar are excruciatingly hot!

Congee With Dried Anchovies

Congee with Dried Anchovies, photo by PH Morton

Congee With Dried Anchovies

When we stayed at the Armada Hotel, in Malate, Philippines for almost a whole week, everyday, I started by breakfast with congee or lugaw topped with crispily fried dried anchovies or dilis.

It was strange at first as I have never had dili in my lugaw before but I quickly developed a taste for it.  It sets the day right.

Now back in London, I am missing this little treat.  Thank goodness it is pretty easy to make at home.

Here is the recipe –

Ingredients:

Congee
  1. 3 tsp sesame oil
  2. 1 small onion, chopped finely
  3. 1/2 cup long-grain rice (uncooked)
  4. 4 cups vegetable stock or 3 vegetable cubes dissolved in 4 cups of hot water
  5. 1/2 ” piece of ginger (grated finely)
Toppings
  1. 2 tbsp chili oil
  2. 2 tbsp dried anchovies, fried until golden and crispy
  3. 1 egg (boiled)
  4. 6 cloves garlic, chopped finely and then fried until golden brown
  5. 1 stalk spring onion, chopped
  6. Fish sauce
  7. Calamansi or lemon, juiced

Preparation:

Congee

  1. Heat the sesame oil in a large saucepan over high heat.
  2. Add the chopped onion and fry until translucent.
  3. Stir in the rice and cook for a couple of minutes until well covered with the oil.
  4. Pour in vegetable stock, add the ginger and bring to a boil.
  5. When it starts to boil, reduce the heat and leave to simmer but ensure to give it a stir once in a while.
  6. When the rice had softened and absorbed most of the liquid and has a porridge-like thickness, then it is cooked but if a more runny consistency is wished, add more hot water.

Toppings

  1. Fry the anchovies in wok or frying pan with a little oil.  Stir for 5 minutes until golden brown and crispy all over.
  2. Ladle a good portion for one in a bowl. Add a bit of fish sauce to the congee.  Sprinkle with the fried garlic and chopped spring onion then add the chopped boiled egg and dried anchovies.
  3. Finally drizzle with the juice of calamansi or lemon according to taste.

Enjoy!

Pork Adobo Recipe

Pork Adobo, photo by JMorton

Pork Adobo Recipe

We have now a good selection of adobo recipes, which you can ‘search’ in this site.

I’ve always thought that adobo is a dish inherited or influenced by Spanish cuisine.  After all they were the Filipino overlords for 333 years.

But apparently not, adobo or rather this recipe is truly native to the Philippines.  It is so delicious that when the Spanish conquistadors tasted it, they insisted that it be called something Spanish, hence the adobo.  Filipino adobo apparently is pretty similar to a Spanish dish called adobo.

Anyway, this recipe is very versatile.  It can be used to cook not only pork, but chicken, beef, goat, lamb or mutton, seafood and even vegetables as well.  Not only that adobo can also be a meat combination, especially of pork and chicken or vegetable and meat, like string beans and pork tandem.

Originally adobo is not added any soy sauce but just seasoned with the ordinary salt.  It was the influence of the large Chinese contingents in the Philippines that Chinese condiments started to be used profusely.

Pork Adobo

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs pork belly, sliced into fairy big bite-size pieces
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 6-8 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp whole pepper corn
  • 1 cup water
  • salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Using a large bowl, combine the soy sauce, vinegar, garlic and bay leaves.
  2. To this add the pork belly.  Stir into the marinade and leave to soak all the goodness for at least an hour, covered in plastic cling film inside the fridge,
  3. Heat a wok or a large heavy bottomed saucepan.
  4. Drop in the pork belly and the marinade. Heat for a couple of minutes.
  5. Add the cup of water and whole pepper corns, then bring to a boil.
  6. Turn down the heat, cover the pan and leave to simmer until the meat is tender.  This should take about 40 minutes to an hour.
  7. Check seasoning, add salt  according to taste
  8. Transfer to a serving dish.  Decorate with a small sprig of parley and slices of onion as per photo above. 🙂
  9. Serve hot with freshly boiled rice.
  10. Share and enjoy.  I find even my English family and friends are rather partial to adobo, especially pork ones.
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