Category: Filipino Recipe

Stuffed Milkfish (Rellenong Bangus)

Stuffed Bangus, Photo by PH Morton

Stuffed Bangus, Photo by Arnold Gamboa

This recipe is suitable for special occassion or celebration.  It is extra delicious bursting with goodness.

Stuffed Milkfish (Rellenong Bangus)

Ingredients

  • 1 large sized bangus ( milkfish )
  • 1 onion, chopped finely
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 small sized carrot, small cubes
  • 1 box raisins ( optional )
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 raw egg, large
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • ½ tsp. Worcestershire sauce (or light soy sauce)
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped finely
  • 2 tbsp. Flour
  • cooking oil for frying
Instructions
  1. Ask the fish-monger to clean and remove the scales of the fish or using a knife, scrape fish by going against the scales.   This is fairly easy to do. Gently pound the fish using flat side of a heavy spoon or Chinese knife.  Pounding will loosen meat from the skin. Ensure that the skin is not damaged or broken.
  2. Carefully cut the big bone that run through the fish, from the tail end up to the head. Then pull this out.
  3. Insert a long spoon or spatula through the bangus neck.  Gently prise out meat away from the skin. Scrape as much of the flesh throughout the whole fish but always be aware not to break the skin.
  4. Make the marinade for the skin by mixing the soy sauce and calamansi (lime) juice. In a large dish arrange the fish skin flatly and pour and marinate by pour the soy sauce mix all over.  Leave for 10 minutes or so.
  5. Simmer the fish meat in a little water, once opaque, drain and remove any visible bones as you flake the meat.
  6. Using a wok or frying pan, sauté the garlic until golden brown. Add onion and tomatoes. Stir in carrot, and pepper as well as the fish meat. Season well with salt, freshly ground black pepper, and Worcestershire sauce or light soy sauce.
  7. Add raisins.
  8. Remove from the heat and let it cool slightly.
  9. Now open up the marinating fish skin and fill  it up with the cooked fish meat/tomato/onion mix.  Stuff until the skin has ballooned into a fish-like shape once again.
  10. Beat the egg and then pour it into the stuffed fish and then roll the fish into the flour.
  11. Finally wrap the fish with banana life or aluminium foil and roast for 30-40 minutes at 180ºC.  If using aluminium foil, remove at the last 10 minutes.  This recipe can also be cooked by deep-frying using a large wok.  There is no need to wrap the fish with anything!
  12. Serve immediately.

Enjoy with tomato ketchup.  Sarap (delicious)

Spaghetti with Shrimp Pesto

Spaghetti in Shrimp Pesto, Photo by Arnold Gamboa

Spaghetti with Shrimp Pesto

 The above photo was taken by Arnold Gamboa, a former child matinee idol of the late 70s in the Philippines.
  • 500g Spaghetti (dried or fresh)
  • ½ lb shrimp/prawn, peeled, deveined and tailed off
  • ¾ – 1 CUP PESTO SAUCE
  • ½ lemon, juiced
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced or chopped finely
  • 2 tbsp grated parmesan cheese

    ———————————————-

    Fresh Pesto Recipe

    Ingredients

  • 50g pine nuts
  • 80g basil
  • 50g Parmesan
  • 150ml olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves

    Method

    1. Heat a small frying pan over a low heat. Dry fry the pine nuts until golden.
    2. Put the pine nuts into a food processor together with the remaining ingredients and process until smooth.
    3. Pour the pesto into a jar and cover with a little extra oil, then seal and store in the fridge. It will keep in a fridge for a good couple of weeks.

    —————————————————-

    Instructions

    Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add a pinch of salt and a teaspoon of olive oil and cook spaghetti according to the packet’s instruction.

    No 1 way:  Drain and arrange over a large serving plate as above photo. (then top with the pesto and shrimp)

    No 2 way is to return the pasta back into the pan, adding the pesto and 25g of parmesan. Toss well, then transfer to a serving plate and sprinkle with the rest of the Parmesan. Then arrange cooked shrimps on top.

    Concurrently, heat a saucepan, add the olive oil, minced garlic, shrimp and sprinkle with the lemon juice. Stir until shrimps are opaquely reddish.  This might take about 5 minutes.

    Once shrimp are fully cooked, add the pesto and stir well.  Use as topping for no 1 way.

    Serve immediately.

    PS  No1 or No2 only differs on how you want to present the dish, both taste the same. 🙂

Sautéed Green Beans With Shrimps

Green Beans , photo by Rosie Reyes- Barrera

Sautéed Green Beans With Shrimps

This recipe is as easy as ABC.  It is a quick stir-fry for maximum taste and goodness.

Ingredients

  • 150g shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 300g string beans, cut into 2 inches length
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 2 ripe tomatoes, chopped finely
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  •  2 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Heat the vegetable oil with the olive oil in a wok or large frying pan over fairly high heat.
  2. Saute the onion, tomatoes, and garlic. (onion, tomato and garlic are the trinity ingredients of Filipino saute. 🙂 )
  3. Once the onion turns soft and the tomatoes mushy, add the shrimp and stir fry for 2 – 3 minutes.
  4. Add the string beans and soy sauce. Continue to stir fry for 5 minutes.
  5. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Enjoy with a freshly boiled or fried rice.

Sinigang Na Manok (Chicken Sinigang)

Chicken Sinigang, Photo by Mae Mercado-Sanguer

Sinigang Na Manok (Chicken Sinigang)

This is a comfort food and ‘getting-over-a-flu’ kind’ of dish.  It has that lovely sour taste that would seduce your uninterested palate! LOL

Ingredients:

2lbs chicken thighs and chicken legs (or one whole chicken cut into serving pieces)

1-2 packets of Knorr or Mama Sita Sinigang Mix (or use 2 cups of tamarind tops/young leaves and flowers)

1/2 lb strings beans (green beans), cut into 1½ inches pieces

2 medium size aubergines (eggplants)

1 cup radish (daikon)  sliced

5 long green chilli

1½ tbsp fish sauce (patis)

1 cup tomatoes, quartered

1 large onion, sliced roughly

10-12 cups water

Method of Preparation:

  1. Using a large casserole pan, heat the water up.  If using tamarind leaves and flowers tie and wrap them using banana leaves muslin cloth/gauze and boil.
  2. Add the chicken pieces, onions and tomatoes.
  3. If using the more convenient sinigang mix, which is readily available in most Oriental supermarket, pour it in the casserole.  Mix it in.  If it is not sour enough according to your taste, add half or another packet of the sinigang mix. Simmer for 10-12 minutes.
  4. Season with the fish sauce.
  5. Add the string beans, aubergines, radish and green chilli.
  6. Cook for 10 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.
  7. Finally check and adjust the seasoning.

Enjoy with freshly boiled rice.

 

Ginataang Kalabasa At Sitaw (Squash & String Beans in Coconut Milk)

Ginataang Kalabasa at Sitaw, photo by Rosie Reyes- Barrera

Ginataang Kalabasa At Sitaw (Squash & String Beans in Coconut Milk)

If there was a comfort food, this was it (for me anyway!)

I love this recipe with such a passion.  This is real Filipino home-cooking at its best, again for me anyway! 🙂

I think squash was made to be cooked in coconut milk.  A marriage made in a hot-wok-heaven!  Before I go on to more and more overblown pontification, here is a basic recipe for this delicious dish.

Ingredients:

1 small or 1/2 a squash or pumpkin, peeled, deseeded and cubed

200g string beans (green beans), cut into about 1½ to 2 inches lengths.

1 cup shrimps, shelled and deveined (boil the shells & heads to flavour a cup of water to make a shrimp juice)

1 cup shrimp juice (or just plain water)

2 cups coconut milk

5 cloves garlic, chopped or minced finely

1/4 cup shrimp paste (bagoong na alamang) or 1¼ tbsp fish sauce

1 onion, peeled and sliced thinly

1 cup malunggay leaves of spinach (optional)

1½tbsp vegetable oil

salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Preparation:

  • Heat the oil in a wok or large frying pan.
  • Sauté the garlic  and onion.
  • Add the the shrimps.
  • Stir in the shrimp paste, if using.
  • Pour in the shrimp juice or cup of water
  • Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and allow to simmer.
  • Drop in the squash and string beans.
  • Pour in the coconut milk and continue to stir well until it begins to boil.
  • Adjust the seasoning by adding salt and black pepper.
  • Finally add the malunggay or spinach and continue cooking for a couple of minutes more.

Serve hot with lots of freshly boiled rice.

Enjoy!

TIP:  Instead of shrimps, you can add sauteed pork instead.

Ginataang Kuhol (Escargot in Coconut Milk)

Escargot in Coconut Milk, Photo by Rosie Reyes-Barrera

Ginataang Kuhol (Escargot in Coconut Milk)

I love and miss eating snails!  That doesn’t sound right!  That sounded too full-on with too much yucky factor 🙂 .  I think I would call it with the more exotic French word for snail, escargot, instead.

When I was a young girl living in Marag, we used to eat a lot of escargots, which are called bisukol in Ilocano `(and kuhol in Tagalog).

My memories of bisukol (escargot) is deeply embedded into my happy family nostalgia.  Eating these little critters bring back memories of strong family bonding.

In our province of Marag in Kalinga-Apayao, Philippines, dining with bisukol involves both hand and arms actions.  To prepare the bisukol, prior to cooking, get a fairly heavy ladle or metal spoon and tap to break the bottom of each snail.  This will allow the snail flesh to come out easily.  And the most fun way of eating a bisukol is to pick one up with your right hand ensuring that the snail opening is facing down onto your plate, then banging your right wrist into your slightly extended left wrist a la Psy Gangnam Style (the horsey bit) until the snail meat comes out and drops on your plate.  It was very satisfying watching everyone doing the arm action at the dining table.  LOL

In the West, every paraphernalia seems to be available for most food, exotic or otherwise.  Like with escargot, when eaten in fine restaurant, you will get a snail tong (like the ones with Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman) and a two-prong snail fork.

Snail fork or arms action, escargot is exotically delicious!  Below is a very satisfying recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs escargot (kuhol)
  • 3 cups coconut milk
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • 2 tablespoon ginger, cut into fine strips
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 tbsp shrimp paste (1½ tbsp fish sauce)
  • 2 green long chilli pepper
  • Kangkong leaves (Swamp cabbage/ water spinach), cut and trimmed into manageable size for comfortable dining 😉
  • Salt & pepper to taste
Cooking procedure:
  1. Tap each of the snails’ bottom to break, then wash the escargot thoroughly, removing all the grits.  Did you know if you live in the UK, those pesky snails in your garden are edible.  According to Gordon Ramsey,  intrepid gourmets can go to the garden to gather up the snails. As an added bonus, these wild garden snails taste far better than those which are farmed.  However you cannot just put garden snails directly to the pot and eat them.  There are steps to be taken first for health, taste and safety reasons.  First leave the snails watered but without food for two days to get rid of any toxin they might have ingested.  On the third day, give them carrots; watch their droppings.  If they start to poop orange substance, wash them again and put them in a sealed container into your fridge.  when they are soporific, they are ready to cook.  Thank goodness you can get snails, which have been purge and ready to cook.
  2. Heat up the cooking oil in a large pan or better yet a wok (kawali),
  3. Saute the garlic, onion  and ginger.
  4. Drop in the escargots followed by the coconut milk.
  5. Bring to a boil and then lower down the heat and continue to simmer until the coconut milk turns slightly creamy.
  6. Stir in the shrimp paste or fish sauce.
  7.  Add the Long chilli peppers and Kangkong ( water spinach) and simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. Check and adjust the seasoning by adding more fish sauce or salt and pepper if needed.
  9. Serve with freshly boiled or steamed rice.  Arm wrestle your way to a delicious escargot.  It is fun.

Pinakbet a la Kagay-Anon Style

Pinakbet a la Kagay-Anon, photo by Carol Elep

Ingredients
  • 4 pcs round eggplant, cut in half
  • 2 pcs small bitter melon (ampalaya), quartered
  • ½ bundle string beans, cut into 2 inch length
  • 1 small sweet potato (kamote), quartered
  • 8 pcs small okra
  • 2 thumbs ginger, thinly sliced
  • 1 large tomato, cubed
  • 1 large onion, cubed
  • 1½ cup water
  • 1 lb bagnet or lechon kawali
  • ½ cup Anchovy sauce (bagoong isda)
Instructions
  1. In a large pan, place water let boil
  2. Put in the anchovy sauce and wait for the mixture to boil once more
  3. Add-in the vegetables starting with the ginger, then the sweet potatoes, okra, bitter melon, eggplant, string beans, tomato, and onion and simmer for 15 minutes
  4. Add the bagnet or lechon kawali (cooking procedure available in the recipe section) and simmer for 5 minutes
  5. Serve hot. Share and Enjoy!

Tinolang Lapu-lapu (Grouper Fish Tinola)

Tinolang Lapu-lapu, photo by Carol Elep

Tinolang Lapu-lapu (Grouper Fish Tinola)

The Philippines is an archipelago, a cluster of islands surrounded by water and as such, fishing is a major source of living and fish is one of the staple food of the country.

The Filipinos, therefore, have an extensive recipes cook and preserve these lovely fresh delicious fish; many are naive to the country, passed down from generation to the next, some are adapted from international recipes and gave them its own distinct Filipino flavour, and plenty more made up from growing amount of available ingredients in the market.

Tinolang Lapu-lapu is a really nourishing.  It is an all-round season recipe, can be enjoyed by all at whatever the weather.

Lapu-lapu is called grouper  fish in English.  Ask your fish monger to clean and cut the fish.

Ingredients:

1/2 kilo or just over a pound of Lapu-lapu (grouper) fish, cleaned and cut
3 stalks spring onion, cut into an inch length pieces
3 pieces lemon grass, chopped
1 inch ginger (optional), chopped finely
1 vegetable stock cube (knorr or Oxo)
1 small marrow or 2 courgettes
6 cups water
Salt & pepper

Procedure:

Bring to a boil the cups of water in a casserole pan over high heat.

Drop in the spring onions, lemon grass, ginger and stock cube. Give it a stir and then over the pan.

Turn down the heat and leave to simmer for 5 minutes.

Add in the marrow or courgettes slices and the fish, continue to simmer for 8-10 minutes in medium heat.

Season it with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Enjoy the taste of the oriental sea at its best!

Pansit Chami Recipe

Pancit Chami, Photo by Carol Elep

Pansit Chami Recipe

Pansit Chami is a specialty of Lucena, the capital city of the Quezon province in the Philippines.  This recipe is much beloved that a festival had been created.  Each month of May, a pansit Chami  competition is held to look for anyone who can cook up the best tasting Chami.  This followed by eating contest. 🙂  Audience participation is also included as they get to sample the cooked pansit Chami from the competition, thus a fun festival enjoyed by all.

Chami is derived from two Chinese words, Chaocai (stir-fry) and mi (noodles).  Chami is made from flat noodles, Miki, which is a Shanghai-style noodles.

Below is the basic recipe provided by the Lucena Community Website.  You can make the recipe truly your own by improvising; adding more toppings of your own preference.

Pansit Chami Basic Recipe

Ingredients:

2 cups cooked chicken meat, diced or flaked
1 – 2 cups shrimp, cooked and shelled
1 large carrot, peeled and sliced to strips
½ head roughly chopped cabbage
1 kg miki noodles or fresh-egg noodles
½ cup soy sauce
4 tbsp brown sugar
3 tbsp vegetable oil
1 large onion, chopped
6 gloves garlic, minced
1 tsp ground pepper
1 – 2 pcs of siling labuyo
2 cups chicken broth

Procedure:
1. In a large pan or wok, heat vegetable oil and sauté garlic and onion.

2. Put in the chicken meat, and cook until browned.

3. Add carrot strips.

4. Add in the noodles and continue cooking on high heat until the noodles are slightly cooked.

5. Add soy sauce and chicken broth.

6. Add brown sugar then season with ground pepper. Continue cooking with regular stirring.

7. Adjust seasonings to your taste, you can put in the siling labuyo.

8. When the noodles are almost done, add in cabbage and continue cooking for several minutes more, until the broth is reduced into a slightly thick sauce.

9. Garnish with cooked shrimps or quail eggs. Best served with calamansi.

 

Mung Beans Stew with Spinach (Ginisang Mungo)

Ginisang Mungo, by Mae Mercado Sanguer

Mung Beans Stew with Spinach (Ginisang Mungo)

This is a classic Filipino dish.  A great favourite of many.  Almost a mainstay on a meat-free Friday, where the pork belly is substituted with prawns or dried anchovies instead. (In the UK, perhaps some slivers of smoked haddock!)

INGREDIENTS:

  • 200g pork belly, sliced
  • 4-5 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 2 large tomatoes, sliced 
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil   
  • 200g Baby spinach or kale leaves, chopped
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce or salt to taste
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 cup mung beans

Method of Preparation:

  • Rinse the mung beans thorough in running water.  Discard the floaters.
  • Using a large casserole pan,  boil the mung beans in the water.  Lower down the heat and leave to simmer until the mung beans green casings have separated and floated on top.  Get a serrated spoon or ladle to remove the casing and then discard.  This is optional, the casing is safe to eat, I just don’t really like them. 🙂 – a personal choice.
  • In a frying pan, heat the vegetable oil and stir-fry the pork. Cook until golden all over. Remove the pork from pan and set aside. 
  • Using the same pan, saute garlic, onion and tomatoes until completely softened into a gooey mess of total goodness. 🙂
  • Add the pork and fish sauce.  Cook for 5 minutes.
  • Tip the sautéed pork into the casserole of simmering mung beans. 
  • Add  the kale leaves and cook for 5-8 minutes or spinach and cook for 4 minutes.
  • Quickly adjust the seasoning and it is all done!

Best served with freshly boiled rice and a side of freshly grilled of fried fish.

Enjoy!