Category: Filipino Recipe

Adidas Adobo (Chicken Feet Adobo)

Chicken feet Adobo, photo by Ruben Ortega

chicken feet, photo by PH Morton

Adidas is the name given to chicken feet.  Obviously as a homage to the great trainers brand.

The raw chicken feet photo was taken by Peter during one of our shopping at the wet market of Pritil in Tondo, Manila, Philippines.

To be truthful, I have not really tasted chicken feet before but Peter had.  He said it was taste but rather rubbery.  I’ll take his word for it.  🙂

Ingredients

  • 1-2 lbs chicken feet, cleaned thoroughly
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon whole peppercorn
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1/2 tablespoon sugar
  • 5-6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tsp dried chilli
  • 3-4 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1½ cups water

 

 Method of Preparation:

  1. Clean the chicken feet thoroughly and trim all claws.  Butchers usually would have trimmed the scary claws already. 🙂
  2. Heat a large saucepan or a wok and add the chicken feet with the soy sauce, vinegar and water.
  3. Also add the bay leaves, peppercorn, sugar and half of the crushed garlic.  Do not stir.  Bring this to a boil and then lower down the heat and leave to simmer for three quarters of an hour. (45 minutes)
  4. Remove the chicken feet from the remaining liquid.  Drain and then set aside the stewed feet. Do not discard the liquid sauce from the wok.  Pour in a container and set aside.
  5. Clean the wok and heat.
  6. Add the oil.  Stir in the remaining garlic and fry until fragrant.
  7. Add the dried chilli.
  8. Stir in the fried chicken feet and fry until sizzling hot.
  9. Pour in the liquid sauce and heat for a minute or two.
  10. Transfer into a serving bowl and enjoy with a few beers.

Spicy Spare Ribs in Banana Ketchup

Spare ribs, photo by Mae Mercado-Sanguer

Spicy Spare Ribs in Banana Ketchup

Banana ketchup has a very distinct taste.  It is sweet and spicy.

Apparently this condiment was created during the second world war by a Filipina food technologist, Maria Y. Oroza.

This came about because there was a shortage of tomatoes but there was an abundance of bananas.

What does Maria have to do to assuage hungry tummies wanting sauce for their less than appetising meagre repast.  Eureka!  Banana ketchup!

Not before long, Mafran was mass producing the product and the rest is history.

Banana ketchup is not just a condiment for the dinner table.  It has become a major ingredients in many a Filipino recipes such as in Filipinised Spaghetti Bolognese, omelette, etc.

Below is a spare rib recipe, which by the way can be made from beef or pork.  To maximise the taste, it is advisable to leave the ribs to marinate overnight.

 

Ingredients

  • 2½ lbs beef or pork spare ribs
  • 1 can Sprite or 7Up
  • salt
  • Oil for frying
  • 1 cup Banana Ketchup
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced to a paste
  • 3 tbsp butter or margarine
  • 2 bird’s eye chillies (labuyo), chopped finely
  • 2 onions, chopped finely
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tbsp caster sugar

Method of Preparation:

  • Wash the ribs and let it drain.  Rub them with salt and then set aside for 15 minutes.
  • Put the ribs in a large bowl and Pour the Sprite or 7Up over.  Leave to marinate for half and hour.
  • Using a mixing bowl, put together the banana ketchup, garlic, butter or margarine, chillies, onions, black pepper, bay leaf and caster sugar.  Give it a thorough mix.
  • Pour this to the marinating ribs in Sprite.  Give it a good stir to cover the meat completely.
  • Cover the bowl of ribs with cling film and leave in the fridge overnight.
  • Heat the oil in a large pan or deep-fryer.
  • Scrape off the juices and sauces from the ribs and carefully lower into the hot oil.  Fry them in batches.
  • Cook until golden all over.
  • Pour the marinade into a pan and heat until bubbling hot.
  • Serve this as a sauce for the ribs.
  • Enjoy with some salad and boiled rice a la Filipino style. 🙂

 

Fried Chicken (Filipino Recipe)

Fried Chicken, photo by Mae Mercado-Sanguer

Fried Chicken (Filipino Recipe)

 

Ingredients

  • 1 whole chicken, cut into segment pieces
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, peeled and pounded into paste
  • 2 tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper (according to taste
  • oil for deep-frying

Method of Preparation:

  • Wash the chicken pieces and drain thoroughly, then place in a large bowl.
  • Put it the garlic in a separate container.
  • Pour in the soy sauce and vinegar over the garlic.
  • Season with a bit of salt and a good amount of freshly ground black pepper for spice.
  • Give it a thorough mix.
  • Pour this mixture over the chicken pieces.  Ensure that all the pieces get a soak in.
  • Cover the bowl with cling film and leave to marinate for a couple of hours.
  • Drain the chicken pieces and fry in deep hot oil over medium heat.  Cook until golden brown all over.
  • Serve hot with some salad and of course unli rice. 🙂  (unlimited rice)

 

Kilawing Puso Ng Saging (Banana Heart Ceviche)

Kilawing Puso Ng Saging by Rosie Reyes- Barrera

Kilawing Puso Ng Saging (Banana Heart Ceviche)

This recipe is one of my favourite.  It slight sour taste makes for a good hearty meal.

Ingredients

  • 1 banana blossom (a can of banana blossom from Asian supermarket)
  • 1 cup coconut milk (fresh or canned)
  • 2 large tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 50 g of cooked pork, sliced into thin strips (optional)
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 tbsp vinegar
  • salt & freshly ground black pepper

 

Method of Preparation:

  • Prepare the banana blossom (if using the fresh sort) by removing and discarding the tough outer layers.  Then slice thinly crosswise.
  • Soak the slices in salty water for 10 minutes.  Then squeeze until most of the liquid had been drained out.  The procedure is to remove any bitter taste from the banana heart (if only you can also do this with the human heart 🙂 lol)
  • Rinse the banana heart slices in cold water and then set aside to drain.
  • Heat the oil in a wok or a large frying pan.
  • Saute the garlic until aromatic and golden brown, please do not burn, otherwise it will leave a bitter taste.
  • Add the onion and the tomatoes to the garlic and allow to cook for 3 minutes until the tomatoes are softened and the onion translucent.
  • Stir in the banana blossom as well as the pork (if using)
  • Season with salt and freshly ground pepper.  Add the vinegar and leave to simmer for 2 minutes.
  • Pour in the coconut milk.  Give it a stir and cook for a couple of minutes more.
  • Remove from heat and serve immediately with freshly boiled rice.

 

Biko From Alma’s Kitchen

Biko, photo by PH Morton

Biko From Alma’s Kitchen

My sister-in-law, Alma is a very capable woman.  A good example of a decent human being.  She is friendly, she is caring, she can’t do enough to be helpful to anyone.

She is well like by everyone.

Her abilities go on and on.  What I like most about her is her cooking.  She can really cook up a storm.

Her biko is to die for.  Peter, my English hubby, who do not usually eat anything made of rice love’s Alma’s biko.

The above photo was from Alma’s kitchen.  Doesn’t it look so delicious?  And it was so yummy.

Click here for the recipe!

Biko a a favourite of mine.  It reminds me of happy childhood and young adulthood in the Philippines. It reminds me of my loving family, cheerful, always ready for a laugh and adventure.

I remember my mother going to market and coming home with biko, which we would share and enjoy.

I remember my grandfather coming home with ‘pasalubong’ of biko, amongst others, when he goes out.

Biko is a symbol of halcyon days for me!

Sinangag (Garlic Fried Rice Filipino Style)

Sinangag, Photo by JMorton

Sinangag Breakfast , Photo by JMorton

Sinangag (Garlic Fried Rice Filipino Style)

Filipino fried rice called sinangag is the easiest fried rice recipe to do.

It is so tasty because of the addition of fragrant garlic.  It gets even tastier if the oil you fry it in was from the oil you fried your meat of dried fish in as it absorbed all the tasty residue of the meat or fish.

Fried rice are better cooked from left-over rice or at least rice that has been cooked a day or night before.  A day old rice has a a better texture as it had ‘dried’ up as it sits on the fridge.  A fried rice from a freshly boiled rice tend to yield a rather soggy mess.

Sinangag cannot be simpler.  It can just be from left-over rice, onion and garlic.  This is because it is often eaten with separately cooked friend eggs, salted eggs, hot-dog sausages or the best there is – tuyo or danggit.  (See above photo.)  All washed down with a hot strong milky coffee.

Ingredients:

2 cups leftover rice, even out the clumps

4-6 garlic, peeled and chopped or minced finely

1/2 onion, chopped finely

salt & pepper to taste

1 tbsp cooking oil

Procedure:

Heat the oil using a wok or a large frying pan over medium to high heat.

Fry the garlic, then quickly add the onion.  Stir-fry until fragrant.

Add the rice.  Fry vigorously until the grains absorbed all the oil giving off a fragrant breakfasty aroma. 🙂

Serve immediately with any of your favourite meaty or fishy breakfast.

Enjoy!

 

Just Tomato & Salt

Salty Tomato, Photo by JMorton

Vine tomatoes, photo by JMorton

Just Tomato & Salt

There is some truth about the best things in life are the simplest things.

Like this recipe for instance.  A few ripe tomatoes, sliced and then drizzled with a bit of salt is delicious with boiled rice and some fried fish.

Sometimes though, this salted tomatoes is a complete meal with a plate of fried rice.

I remember when we were still children, my mother would serve us rice with some viand of vegetables and fish and this recipe of salty tomatoes. I would watch her not bothering with a knife to slice the juicy ripe tomatoes.  With dexterity she you would pull a tomato apart with just one hand and it was the loveliest memory of delicious childhood.

I have to say that when I first came to the UK, the tomatoes did not taste like the Philippine tomatoes.  They looked the same but the UK ones are bland.

It was some few years later that Sainsburys started selling flavoursome tomatoes.  It tasted slightly like the good tomatoes of the Philippines.  But why has a tomato has to be flavoursome to taste like the real thing?

The Recipe:

Ripe firm tomatoes, sliced

a pinch of salt

  • Sprinkle the salt to the sliced tomatoes.
  • Stir
  • Serve
  • 🙂  Yummy

 

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