Category: Visionaries

Saint David’s Day

Saint David’s Day

 

March 1st  is Saint David’s Day.

Did you remember to celebrate it yesterday?

The first day of March was chosen in remembrance of the death of Saint David as traditionally it is believed that he might have died on that day in 569, 588 or even 589; the date is uncertain.

Stainglass picture of St David of Wales

Stainglass depicting St David of Wales

St David (Dewi Sant) was a Celtic monk, abbot and bishop, who lived in the sixth century.  He spread the word of Christianity across Wales.

St David's own flag flown over Churches and some public buildings on St David's Day

St David’s own flag flown over Churches and some public buildings on St David’s Day

A  famous story about Saint David tells how he was preaching to a huge crowd and the ground is said to have risen up, so that he was standing on a hill and everyone had a better chance of hearing and seeing him.

 He was born towards the end of the 5th century. He was of the royal house of Ceredigion, and founded a Celtic monastic community at Glyn Rhosyn (The Vale of Roses) on the western headland of Pembrokeshire (Sir Benfro) where St David’s Cathedral  stands today. David was famous for being a teacher.  His monastery at Glyn Rhosin became an important Christian shrine and important centre in Wales. Before  his death, Saint David is said to have uttered these words: “Brothers be ye constant. The yoke which with single mind ye have taken, bear ye to the end; and whatsoever ye have seen with me and heard, keep and fulfil.”

Welsh ex-pats around the  world celebrate St David’s Day. The  daffodil  & the leek are the national emblem of Wales and badges of which are worn with pride.

Daffodil flower and emblem of Wales

Daffodil flower and emblem of Wales

Why a leek as an emblem?  One theory is that St David advised the Welsh, on the eve of battle with the Saxons, to wear leeks in their caps to distinguish friend from the enemy. Shakespeare mentions in Henry V, that the Welsh archers (fearsome for the power and accuracy of their legendary long bows,)  wore leeks at the battle  with the French at Agincourt in 1415.

The Leek vegetbale an other emblem of Wales

The Leek vegetable an other emblem of Wales

The traditional meal on St David’s Day is cawl. This is a soup that is made of leek and other locally grown produce.

Another symbol of Wales is  the iconic Welsh Dragon  in Welsh- Y Ddraig Goch (“the red dragon”)

Welsh National-Flag

The Welsh National Flag

It  appears on the national flag of Wales. The flag is also called Y Ddraig Goch.

The Historia Brittonum(History of Britons written around 828)  records the first  use of the dragon to  symbolise Wales.

The Dragon was popularly supposed to have been the battle standard of the legendary King Arthur  other ancient Celtic leaders. archaeological  literature, and documentary history suggests that  it evolved from an earlier Romano-British national symbol.  During the reigns of the  Tudor Monarchs, the red dragon was used as a symbol of support  in the English Crown’s coat of arms (one of two supporters, along with the traditional English lion).  The red dragon is often seen as symbolising all things Welsh, and flags are flown  by many public and private institutions in Wales and some in London too.

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1 March 2014

To celebrate St David’s Day Google has this special doodle to commemorate the occasion.

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Thought and Quote for the Day – Nelson Mandela

Chris one of the station supervisors at the Underground (Tube)  train station at Golders Green entertains us travellers/commuters by posting quotes. thoughts & sayings on  one of the station noticeboards.  Today he posted this as one as a remebrance  on the day after the great man passed.

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Photo by PH Morton

Land of the Giants

If I have seen farther than others, it is because I was standing on the shoulders of giants.
— Isaac Newton
Thought of the Day
30 October 2013

……………..
What a lovely quote from the genius of all geniuses. He was saying that he owed and was inspired by the intellectuals before him for his own achievements. What an unassuming fellow Newton was. 😉 What a guy!

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Probably Newton was musing about this, thinking about Aristotle, Pythagoras, Galileo, Kepler, etc while sitting under an apple tree when he was boink by apple because of gravity. hmmmmmmmm

Thomas Paine, Political Activist

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Thomas Paine, Political Activist

Though Thomas Paine was born and raised in Great Britain, he served as a conduit for the Americans to take up arms and demand independence from the Brits. Thomas Paine was on of the founding fathers of the United States.

Character is much easier kept than recovered.
– Thomas Paine

 

It is impossible to calculate the moral mischief, if I may so express it, that mental lying has produced in society. When a man has so far corrupted and prostituted the chastity of his mind as to subscribe his professional belief to things he does not believe he has prepared himself for the commission of every other crime.
~Thomas Paine

The Amazing Story of British Science

The British have a remarkable talent for keeping calm, even when there is no crisis.

– Franklin F. Jones

 

From the 1700s Britain, this small group of islands was and still is a leader in science and engineering. Surely Sir Isaac Newton must be regarded as the greatest scientist that ever lived. He formulated the laws or motion and gravity, proved that sun light was not pure white but made up of colour and corpuscular(tiny particles of matter)when he produced a spectrum via two prisms and isolated one colour. He invented the reflecting telescope and for mathematics he invented calculus still a valuable mathematic tool today. His discoveries about energy gravity and motion laid the ground for Einstein.

Below is an article about an excellent new BBC TV series charting the successes and discoveries made by British scientists and engineers.

The Amazing Story of British Science

Sir Isaac Newton, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Sir Tim Berners-Lee. Pictures via Getty

Britons Sir Isaac Newton, Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Sir Tim Berners-Lee all changed the world through their discoveries and inventions

Science Britannica 
Professor Brian Cox
Scientist and presenter

The British Isles are home to just one percent of the world’s population and yet our small collection of rocks poking out of the north Atlantic has thrown up world beaters in virtually every field of human endeavour.

Nowhere is this more obvious than in science and engineering. Edward Jenner came up with vaccines, Sir Frank Whittle ushered in the jet age and Sir Tim Berners-Lee laid the foundations of the world wide web for the Internet. Sir Isaac Newton, Robert Boyle, Charles Darwin, Michael Faraday, George Stephenson, James Watt, Isambard Kingdom Brunel (engineer), Francis Crick ( co discoverer of DNA)… the list is gloriously long.  We can now add Peter Higgs,who proposed the so called ‘God particle’ Higgs Bosun a field that holds particles together, which if if did not exist , sub atomic particles would never had formed into atoms and ultilmately us! The Higgs Bosun has been tentatively discovered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

What is it about Britain that allowed so many great minds to emerge and flourish?

This is a very important question to ask, because science and engineering are not only part of our past – the future of our economy depends to an ever-increasing extent on our continued excellence in scientific discovery and high-tech manufacturing and engineering.

The roots of our success can be traced back many centuries. Oxford and Cambridge Universities were formed over 800 years ago.

They paved the way for the world’s oldest scientific institution, The Royal Society, formed in 1660 by a group including Sir Christopher Wren, professor of astronomy and architect of St Paul’s Cathedral in London.

Science Heroes

 Robert Boyle Boyle 1627 – 1691 is one of  founders of modern chemistry and one of the pioneers of modern experimental scientific method which Britain gave to the world.  He is best known for Boyles Law  which describes the inversely proportional relationship between the absolute pressure and volume of a gas, if the temperature is kept constant within a closed sytem.

Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) was a brilliant physicist and mathematician who is considered a founding father of science.

Charles Darwin (1809 – 1882) was a naturalist and geologist who came up with the world-changing theory of evolution.

Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-1859) was an inventor and engineer who designed some of the UK’s most famous tunnels, bridges, railway lines and ships

Sir Frank Whittle (1907 – 1996) was a daredevil test pilot who is credited with inventing the turbo jet engine

Sir Tim Berners-Lee (1955 – ) is the inventor of the world wide web

Scientist Rosalind Franklin’s photograph’s of X Ray diffraction of DNA confirmed it’s double helix structure

Any theory or idea about the world should be tested and if it disagrees with observations, then it is wrong.

Even today, that’s radical, because it means that the opinions of important and powerful people are worthless if they conflict with reality. So central is this idea to science that it is enshrined in The Royal Society’s motto: “Take nobody’s word for it”.

Shortly after The Royal Society was formed, Sir Isaac Newton deployed this approach in his great work The Principia, which contains his law of gravity and the foundations of what we now call classical mechanics – the tools you need to work out the forces on bridges and buildings, calculate paths of artillery shells and the stresses on aircraft wings. This was arguably the first work of modern physics.

This has become known as the scientific method, and its power can be seen in some unexpected places. During the filming of Science Britannica, I met Capt Jerry Roberts who worked at Bletchley Park during the Second World War.

Bletchley intercepted enemy messages and the captain and his colleagues were given the job of decoding them. He told me the story of his colleague, Bill Tutte, who worked on the ‘Tunny” code used by the Nazi high command to send orders to generals in the field.

Bill spent most of his time staring into space, but after just a few months, with awesome mathematical acumen he cracked the code.

In an age before computers, he did it using mathematics, logic and pencil and paper, aided by a single mistake by a German telegraph operator who sent a message twice. In the opinion of many, Tutte’s achievement was the greatest single intellectual achievement of the 20th Century, shortening the war by years and saving millions of lives on both sides.

This is what happens when genius is aided by the careful, scientific approach pioneered by Newton and others at The Royal Society. Capt Roberts and his colleagues at Bletchley are, in my view, heroes in every sense of the word.

 Bletchley Park was Britain’s main decryption establishment during World War II.

The Buckinghamshire compound is famous as the place where wartime codebreakers cracked the German Enigma code
Codebreaking machines Colossus and Bombe were the forerunners of modern computers. Mathematician Alan Turing helped create the Bombe
Historians estimate that breakthroughs at Bletchley shortened the war by two years
Bletchley Park’s computing  was so innovative
Alan Turing’s work built the foundations of computer science,programming etc. He is regarded as a true genius and founder of modern computing.

Another such genius was Nobel Prize winning phycisist Paul Dirac He was regarded by his friends and colleagues as unusual in character. Albert Einstein said of him “This balancing on the dizzying path between genius and madness is awful”  Among other discoveries, he formulated the Dirac Equation, which  predicted the existence of antimatter.

Despite its tremendous success, scientists have occasionally had a difficult relationship with the wider public. Frankenstein – the ultimate ‘scientist out of control’, has become a short-hand for things we fear.

A particularly colourful example can be found in the grim tale of George Forster, convicted of the double murder of his wife and daughter in 1803 and duly hanged.

This being the 19th Century, nobody was concerned about the hanging itself but rather illogically, the fate of Forster’s corpse caused a public outcry. It was taken directly to a nearby lecture theatre and used to demonstrate the effect of electricity on the human body.

The corpse twitched and jerked and even ‘opened an eye’ as an electric current was applied. There were reports of fainting and a particularly sensitive audience member died of shock – a wonderfully Georgian thing to do. The scientist – a visiting Italian called Giovanni Aldini – was forced to leave the country, when in fact his motives were absolutely sound. He was trying to resuscitate people using electricity.

Far from being a dangerous lunatic, he was ahead of his time. Nowadays thousands of lives are saved as hearts are regularly re-started using electrical pulses delivered by defibrillators.

Aldini’s controversial experiments were performed for a particular purpose, but not all science is carried out with a goal in mind.

Mary Shelley soon after wrote the classic gothic story Frankenstein, a cautionary tale of science out of control.

In the 19th Century, John Tyndall decided to work out why the vivid red and purple colours appeared when the sun is low, and why, for the rest of the time, the sky is blue.

He concluded that the colours of the sky are produced because light bounces off dust and water particles in the air. Blue light is more likely to bounce around than red, and so it is only when the sun is low and the light travels through more of the dust-filled air that the red light is bounced around to produce a sunset.

Tyndall was half right – we now know that it is mainly the air molecules themselves that scatter the light – but this didn’t really matter. Tyndall’s romantic curiosity led to a far more important discovery.

He decided to produce “pure” air with no particles in it, to see if the colours vanished, and he discovered that samples of meat didn’t rot in it. Here was evidence that infection and decay are caused by germs in the air – which Tyndall had inadvertently removed during his purification process. The discovery ultimately transformed the way that doctors dealt with infection and contamination.

Countless millions of lives were saved, because one curious scientist wanted to find out why the sky is blue. Today, the curiosity driven exploration of nature is still known as “blue skies research”.

Science has truly revolutionised our world. It is the basis of our economy and the foundation of our future. We must value our great heritage and continue to invest in education and science to ensure that we never lose our position as the best place in the world to do science.

Carlos Bulosan

Lest we forget, September 11 is coming and the world may remember what violently happened on the same date in 2001 on the east coast of the United States. Terrorists used a passenger plane as a missile that downed the twin towers of the World Trade Center.

On the same date, 45 years earlier, on September 11, 1956, an unrelated, insignificant, nonviolent, but nevertheless sad event occurred on the other coast of the United States. An unknown, penniless writer passed away in Seattle, Washington.

This writer is a 1950’s version of today’s OFWs from the Philippines. He immigrated to the American west coast to look for a better life. But the American greenback disastrously eluded him. His success was in writing in the sophisticated world of America in spite of having had only grade school education in his rural hometown in the Philippines.

In terms of reputation he was unknown – he was no Hemingway nor any of those famous names among American writers. But he successfully broke into print in mainstream America’s publishing world. This was in spite of his handicap that aside from having no education beyond grade school he was a minority person who suffered discrimination.

CarlosBulosanHis name was Carlos Bulosan.

What may be considered a dream accomplishment for Bulosan was when President Roosevelt, just a month after Pearl Hardbor in 1941, commissioned Bulosan’s essay, “Freedom from Want,” as one of a series of FDR’s theme of Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Religious Freedom, Freedom from Want and Freedom from Fear.

Bulosan’s “Freedom from Want” broke into print two years later when the Saturday Evening Post published it in 1943 while World War II raged on both sides of the world.

In a later generation another U.S. President, in his inaugural speech, challenged his countrymen not to ask what their country can do for them but to ask themselves what they can do for their country.

That rang a cunningly similar line in Carlos Bulosan’s “America is in the Heart” which he wrote before JFK got elected.

This is your history trivia for today…

Fred Natividad
Livonia, Michigan

Jose Protacio Rizal

Today, the Philippines is commemorating Rizal’s natal day. 19 June 1861 was the birthdate of Jose Rizal, one of the national heroes of the Philippines. In fact it is always Rizal and Andres Bonifacio who vie for the official title of National Hero of the Philippines. Final verdict is still very much up in the air. Jose Rizal was a pacifist. He believed that independence can be obtained by clear head and without blood being shed. Unknowingly however through his subversive novels, Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) and El Filibusterismo (The Filibuster) he managed to inspire common people to rise up against the tyranny of Spanish colonialism in the Philippines.

One of these people who was so inspired was a self-taught, Andres Bonifacio. Bonifacio went a step further with his bid for independence. He picked up his bolo and founded the KKK or Kataastaasang Kagalanggalang Katipunan ng mga anak ng Bayan (roughly translated to the Highest most honourable Association of the children of the Country) for the likeminded men and women ready to sacrifice their lives for their ideals. This is the crux of the matter with regards to who is the greatest hero, Rizal who inspired the fight for independence through reason or Bonifacio who took up arms to fight the injustices ready to fight and die.
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There was this urban legend that Rizal would come down from his above monument and walk the street of Manila at night. Perhaps he’s aggrieved that the Philippines is now under a much more pervasive kind of bondage. Most Filipinos are now an indentured servants to corruption so deeply rooted anywhere and everywhere in local and national Governments. Hay! Buhay!
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Despite the National Hero title being still under a grey area, Rizal, nevertheless garnered a few honours as The Pride of the Malay Race, The Great Malayan, The First Filipino, some over-zealous label-loving individuals even called Rizal the Messiah of the Revolution, and the Messiah of the Redemption.

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Michaelangelo – Genius With the Superdooper Magic Hands

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni[1] (6 March 1475 – 18 February 1564), commonly known as Michelangelo (Italian pronunciation: [mikeˈlandʒelo]), was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect, poet, and engineer of the High Renaissance who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni[1] (6 March 1475 – 18 February 1564), commonly known as Michelangelo (Italian pronunciation: [mikeˈlandʒelo]), was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect, poet, and engineer of the High Renaissance who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art


Michaelangelo was the real McCoy. The most sublime painter and sculptor of them all.

A man paints with his brains and not with his hands. 
~Michelangelo

Quote & Thought For the Day on 1st of May

Travelling to work early am (06.40)today via Golders Green Underground(Tube)station this morning I saw the latest offering from Chris the duty station supervisor, who cheers us commuteres etc up with the quotes he writes. Here it is below; The words not clear are  ‘It’ & ‘unique’

LU quote May

Arthur C Clarke

Arthur-C-Clarke-in-1984-001

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
– Arthur C Clarke

Arthur C Clarke is regarded as one of the greatest science fiction writers along with Isaac Asimov.

2001, A Space Odyssey might be his greatest. This in itself has a history. The film was based on Clarke’s short story called The Sentinel. The film which was almost dialogue-less and therefore one must use one’s imagination to put a story behind the film.

The 1969 movie is regarded as a classic in the sci-fi genre, with stunning visual effects, mainly using detailed models as this was before computer generated imagery (CGI) existed. To make the movie more understandable, Clarke wrote the novel to accompany the film. In 1984 Clarke wrote a sequel called ‘2010 Odyssey Two’ also made into a movie. 2010 explained more and concluded the  story of 2001, it was a good movie for us who like that type of sci-fi that could become a reality.

Clarke was a scientist who was the first to have the concept of communication satellites orbiting the earth, his early designs are in the Science Museum in London.

Clarke commented ” I don’t believe in astrology. I’m a Saguitarian and we’re sceptical.” 🙂