Category: Global Wit

Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (Gastronome)

Jean-Anthelme_Brillat_de_Savarin_(1755-1826)

Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1 April 1755 – 2 February 1826, ) was a French lawyer and politician, and gained fame as an epicure and gastronome (Wikipedia)

Brillat Savarin wrote what  arguably the most famous book on food, The Physiology of Taste.  It was an intelligent book which has not been out of print to these days.  The book is a celebration of food, very descriptive, lots of opinions, anecdotal, historical, philosophical, factual, fanciful, poetical and some recipes included.

Honore Balzac was a fan of the book.

Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (Gastronome)

Poultry is for the cook what canvas is for the painter.
– Savarin

Tell me what you eat, I’ll tell you who you are.
– Savarin

Saul Bellow – Literature’s Stalwart

saulSaul Bellow (10 June 1915 – 5 April 2005) was a Canadian-born American writer. For his literary contributions, Bellow was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize for Literature, and the National Medal of Arts. He is the only writer to win the National Book Award for Fiction three times and he received the National Book Foundation’s lifetime Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters in 1990. (Wikipedia)

 

Saul Bellow – Literature’s Stalwart

Everybody needs his memories.  They keep the wolf of insignificance from the door.
– S Bellow

The unexamined life can make you want to kill yourself.
– S Bellow

You never have to change anything you got up in the middle of the night to write.
– S Bellow

"Saul Bellow signature" by Saul BellowCreated in vector format by Scewing - Heritage Auctions. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Saul_Bellow_signature.svg#/media/File:Saul_Bellow_signature.svg

Brilliance of John Steinbeck

John_Steinbeck_1962

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 26, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939), East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962 “for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception”. (Wikipedia)

Brilliance of John Steinbeck

He quoted:

A journey is like a marriage.  The certain way to be wrong is to think you control it.
– Steinbeck

***

No one wants advice – only corroboration.
– Steinbeck
***

Time is the only critic without ambition.
– Steinbeck
***
Those traits we detest, sharpness, greed, acquisitiveness, meanness, egotism and self-interest, ae the traits of success.
– Steinbeck

585px-John_Steinbeck_signature.svg

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray by Jesse Harrison Whitehurst

William Makepeace Thackeray by Jesse Harrison Whitehurst

 

William Makepeace Thackeray (18 July 1811 – 24 December 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. He was famous for his satiricalworks, particularly Vanity Fair, a panoramic portrait of English society. – Wikipedia

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William Makepeace Thackeray _self caricature__Project_Gutenberg_eText_19222

William Makepeace Thackeray
_self caricature__Project_Gutenberg_eText_19222

 As Quoted by William Makepeace Thackeray:

After a certain age a new friend is a wonder. There is the age of blossoms and sweet budding green, the age of generous summer, the autumn when the leaves drop, and then winter shivering and bare.
Thackeray

………
Cultivate the friendships of thy youth; it is only in that generous time they are formed.
—Thackeray
………
It is a friendly heart that has plenty of friends.
—Thackeray
………
We are most of us very lonely in this world; you who have any who love you, cling to them and thank God.
—Thackeray

Johann Kaspar (or Caspar) Lavater

Lavater by - August Friedrich Oelenhainz (June 28, 1745 – November 5, 1804) was a German painter

Lavater by – August Friedrich Oelenhainz (June 28, 1745 – November 5, 1804) was a German painter

Johann Kaspar (or Caspar) Lavater

(15 November 1741 – 2 January 1801) was a Swiss poet and physiognomist.

Mr Lavater had a very interesting occupation.  He was apparently a physiognomist which means he had the ability to tell your character just by looking at your outward appearance especially at your face.

Interesting!

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Let us get to know more of Mr Lavater through his quotes:

All affectation is the vain and ridiculous attempt of poverty to appear rich.—Lavater
….
He who comes from the kitchen smells of its smoke; he who adheres to a sect has something of its cant; the college air pursues the student, and dry inhumanity him who herds with literary pedants.
— Lavater

….
Where there is much pretension, much has been borrowed; nature never pretends.
— Lavater
….

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

cervantesMiguel de Cervantes Saavedra better known as Cervantes was a Spanish novelist, poet and playwright.  His magnum opus, Don Quixote is considered as the first modern European novel and many regard it as one of the best novels ever written.

 

rutadelquijote

As Quoted by Cervantes:

All beauty does not inspire love; some please the sight without captivating the affections. If all beauties were to enamour and captivate, the hearts of mankind would be in a continual state of perplexity and confusion—for beautiful objects being infinite, the sentiments they inspire should also be infinite.
…….
Among the attributes of God, although they are all equal, mercy shines with even more brilliancy than justice.
—Cervantes
……….
Beauty in a modest woman is like fire or a sharp sword at a distance; neither doth the one burn nor the other wound those that come not too near them.

……….
Can we ever have too much of a good thing?
– Cervantes

Drink moderately, for drunkenness neither keeps a secret, nor observers a promise.
– Cervantes
…….
Everyone is as God made him and oftentimes a good deal worse.
– Cerantes
…..
Fortune always leaves some door open in misfortune.
– Cervantes
……
Fear is sharp-sighted, and can see things under ground, and much more in the skies.
– Cervantes
……….
God bears with the wicked, but not forever.
– Cervantes

He who loses wealth loses much; he who loses a friend loses more; but he that loses his courage loses all.
— Cervantes
……….
History is the depository of great actions, the witness of what is past, the example and instructor of the present, and monitor to the future.
—Cervantes
………..
Honor and virtue are ornaments of the soul, without which the body, though it be really beautiful, ought not to be thought so.
………..
Hunger is the best sauce in the world. ~
Cervantes
………..
I find my familiarity with thee has bred contempt.
– Cervantes
……….
Ill-luck, you know, seldom comes alone.
– Cervantes
………..
I never thrust my nose into other men’s porridge. It is no bread and butter of mine; every man for himself, and God for us all.
– Cervantes
………..
It is a true saying that a man must eat a peck of salt with his friend before he knows him.
– Cervantes
………..
Let me leap out of the frying-pan into the fire; or, out of God’s blessing into the warm sun.
– Cervantes
……….
Let the worst come to the worst.
– Cervantes
……….
Let every man mind his own business.
– Cervantes
………
Let him who is deceived complain.
………..
Let him to whom faith is broken despair.
……….
Murder will out.
– Cervantes
………
Much time is necessary to know people thoroughly.

………
No fathers or mothers think their own children ugly; and this self-deceit is yet stronger with respect to the offspring of the mind.
– Cervantes
……….
Out of the frying-pan into the fire.
……….
One man is no more than another, only inasmuch as he does more than another.
………..
Plain as the nose on a man’s face.[
– Cervantes
………..
She who loves none can make none jealous, and sincerity ought not to pass for disdain.
……….
Sing away sorrow, cast away care.
– Cervantes
………..
Sometimes we look for one thing and find another.
…………
Self-praise depreciates.
…………
THE beauty of some women has days and seasons, depending upon accidents which diminish or increase it; nay, the very passions of the mind naturally improve or impair it, and very often utterly destroy it.
– Cervantes.
……….
The guts carry the feet, not the feet the guts.
– Cervantes

True love cannot be divided, and must be voluntary and unconstrained.
………..
The viper deserves no blame for its sting, although it be mortal—because it is the gift of Nature.
………..
There is no remembrance which time does not obliterate, nor pain which death does not terminate.
………..
Thank you for nothing.
– Cervantes
………..
The brave man carves out his fortune, and every man is the son of his own works.
– Cervantes
………..
Under a bad cloak there is often a good drinker.
– Cervantes

We are sure of nothing in this life.

………..
Why do you lead me a wild-goose chase?
– Cervantes
………..
Which I have earned with the sweat of my brows.
– Cervantes
Miguel_de_Cervantes_signature.svg

 

As Quoted by Edward Bulwer-Lytton

 

Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton by Henry William Pickersgill

Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton by Henry William Pickersgill

Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton (25 May 1803 – 18 January 1873) was an English novelist, poet, playwright, and politician. He was immensely popular with the reading public and wrote a stream of bestselling novels which earned him a considerable fortune. He coined the phrases “the great unwashed“, “pursuit of the almighty dollar“, “the pen is mightier than the sword“, “dweller on the threshold“, as well as the infamous opening line “It was a dark and stormy night“.
– Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 


As Quoted by  Edward Bulwer-Lytton 

 

A good cigar is as great a comfort to a man as a good cry is to a woman.
– E Bulwer-Lytton

Happy is the man who hath never known what it is to taste of fame – to have it is a purgatory, to want it is a Hell!
~ Bulwer-Lytton

In the lexicon of youth, which fate reserves for a bright manhood, there is no such word as – fail!
~ Bulwer-Lytton

In all cases of heart-ache, the application of another man’s disappointment draws out the pain and allays the irritation.—
– Lytton
….
In these days half our diseases come from neglect of the body in overwork of the brain
—Lytton
….
In science, read, by preference, the newest works; in literature, the oldest.
~Bulwer-Lytton.

It is beautifully said that the veil of futurity is woven by the hand of mercy.
Bulwer-Lytton.
……

Life, that ever needs forgiveness, has, for its first duty, to forgive.
—Lytton.
……
Life would be tolerably agreeable if it were not for its amusements.
– Bulwer-Lytton

Man hazards the condition and loses the virtues of freeman, in proportion as he accustoms his thoughts to view without anguish or shame his lapse into the bondage of debtor.
—Lytton.
……
Rank is a great beautifier.
~ Bulwer-Lytton

Refuse to be ill. Never tell people you are ill; never own it to yourself. Illness is one of those things which a man should resist on principle at the onset.
—Lytton
….
Revolutions are not made with rosewater.
– Bulwer-Lytoon
….

Say what we will, you may be sure that ambition is an error; its wear and tear of heart are never recompensed,—it steals away the freshness of life,—it deadens its vivid and social enjoyments,—it shuts our souls to our own youth,—and we are old ere we remember that we have made a fever and a labor of our raciest years.
– Lytton
………….
There is no man so friendless but what he can find a friend sincere enough to tell him disagreeable truths.
– Bulwer-Lytton
….
What is the difference between being good and bad? The good do not yield to temptations, and the bad do.
The definition was so simple and so wise, that Leonard was more struck with it than he might have been by an elaborate sermon.
—Sir E. B. Lytton

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

longfellow

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet and educator

Art is the gift of God, and must be used unto his glory.
—Longfellow.
………
Do not delay: the golden moments fly!
—Longfellow.
………
“Every man has his secret sorrows, which the world knows not; and oftentimes we call a man cold when he is only sad.”
– Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
………
I venerate old age; and I love not the man who can look without emotion upon the sunset of life, when the dusk of evening begins to gather over the watery eye, and the shadows of twilight grow broader and deeper upon the understanding.

— Longfellow.
………..
Look not mournfully into the past,—it comes not back again; wisely improve the present,—it is thine; go forth to meet the shadowy future without fear, and with a manly heart.
—Longfellow.

Many readers judge of the power of a book by the shock it gives their feelings—as some savage tribes determine the power of muskets by their recoil; that being considered best which fairly prostrates the purchaser.
—Longfellow.

————
Most people would succeed in small things if they were not troubled with great ambitions.
— Longfellow.
………….

The motives and purposes of authors are not always so pure and high, as, in the enthusiasm of youth, we sometimes imagine. To many the trumpet of fame is nothing but a tin horn to call them home, like laborers from the field, at dinner-time, and they think themselves lucky to get the dinner.
—Longfellow.

————
Talk not of wasted affection,
Affection never was wasted;
If it enrich not the heart of another,
Its waters returning
Back to their springs like the rain,
Shall fill them full of refreshment;
That which the fountain sends forth
Returns again to the fountain.
—Longfellow.

………….
Trust no Future, howe’er pleasant!
Let the dead Past bury its dead!
Act, act, in the living Present!
Heart within, and God o’erhead!
—Longfellow.
………….
There are two angels that attend unseen
Each one of us, and in great books record
Our good and evil deeds. He who writes down
The good ones, after every action closes
His volume, and ascends with it to God.
The other keeps his dreadful day-book open
Till sunset, that we may repent; which doing,
The record of the action fades away,
And leaves a line of white across the page.
Now if my act be good, as I believe it,
It cannot be recalled. It is already
Sealed up in heaven, as a good deed accomplished.
The rest is yours.
—Longfellow.
………….

We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done.
— Longfellow.
………….

374px-Henry_Wadsworth_Longfellow_Signature_svg