Category: Medical stuff

Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital – UCLH

rntne_hosp

Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital – UCLH

I finally had my eardrum repair operation yesterday at University College London Hospital and I have to say the service and care were first class.  Excellent in fact!

Because I am growing older by the day, I am more susceptible to illnesses and diseases, which are rather unheard of when younger.  I find that I have a few more medical problems that require me to visit various hospital specialising with ailments of the human body 🙂

My experience with UCLH was the best.  The building itself is very old, inside is quite old as well but very clean and somewhat comforting.

The hospital is also a teaching hospital like the Royal Free Hospital.  The nurses, doctors, consultants and anesthetists were all professionally able. Their bedside manners were friendly, heartening and inspiring.

Additionally, I had a room all to myself.  It was like a private hospital, I was given a welcoming pack consisting of the blurb of what the hospital does, a pair of totes-like socks to use to walk on the very shiny, very clean tiled flooring to prevent you from falling. There were also eye mask, earplugs, dental kit, pen and paper all sealed in a lovely zipped plastic envelop.  The pen was so useful, I used it to answer all the quick crossword puzzle of the Metro newspaper, available at the reception of UCLH.

The food was  good, there were selections for everyone; those with allergies, vegetarian, who are kosher, also who wants halal food and for me, who eats everything. 🙂  I had the Chicken with creamy sauce, and it was delicious completed with jam pudding & custard.

Bimala was my personal nurse.   She was so kind and so cheerful but I also saw other nurses as well, who were equally kind, in the intervals of 15 – 30 minutes taking my heartbeat, temperature, blood pressure, etc.  Apparently to increase the level of oxygen to your body, you have to take a deep breath with your mouth wide open, that will also open your lungs.

Prior to the operation I was visited by the various doctors and the anesthetist, telling me what will happen and the likely side effect of my operation.  Apparently the ears control the facial muscles, the right side of my face can drop, I could have tinnitus, permanent hearing loss, etc.  All wanted to know if I might die during the operation.  Reassuringly, they laughed it off and said they don’t do death!

My surgeon was Dr Quinney, who I consulted at the Edgware Hospital.  He was very serious but you know you will be safe at his hand.

After my operation under general anaesthesia, I was gently woken by reassuring nurses about 4-5, two were Filipinas telling me Gising na Jean (wake up Jean).

I am so happy that we have the NHS.  We should all make sure that it is not privatised for all our sake!

Way With Waists

Having joined and subscribed to the British Heart Foundation, I was sent a magazine package complete with freebies of a recipe booklet and a tape measure of all things, like those used by tailors and dressmakers.

Measure for measure, photo by JMorton

Measure for measure, photo by JMorton

Measure for measure, photo by JMorton

Measure for measure, photo by JMorton

The tape measure is slightly different from the normal ones because it was colour coded.  White for normal waistline and the red to denote dangerzone towards being unhealthy.

Apparently a woman should have a maximum of 32 inches waistline, while men should have 37 inches at the most.  Any higher, would mean an increased risk to health such as  heart disease and diabetes.

Come on guys, get measuring.  If you are over the limit, time to change your routine and lifestyle.

Again remember:

Maximum waistline for women:  32 inches

Maximum waistline for men:  37 inches

Cold and Flu

It was such a lovely weekend! 😉  The weather in London is hot and sunny. The pervading aroma in my neighbourhood was that of meat being barbecued!  Yummy!!!  There were much laughters and chatters reverberating from back gardens to back gardens.  Everyone is out there enjoying the sunshine in the company of families and friends. flu-ss-cartoon

However the weather in the UK has been known to be  forever capricious.  One minute it is hot, the next freezing and showery.  No wonder cold and flu are prevalent and so contagious.  I have been told that we are actually on cold and flu season.  I was also informed that scarlet fever is also on the up, especially amongst school children. What can we do to evade the various viruses that are going around?  There are of course some simple and obvious rule of thumb to follow:

  1. Stock up and take echinacea – 200mg taken up to 3 times a day, echinacea apparently  boosts the immune system.
  2. This is the time to be more self-aware of hygiene.  Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water everytime you visit the loo.  Do not touch your face with unwashed hands.  It is prudent to carry a small bottle of hand sanitiser in your handbag at all times when you are out and about.
  3. It might sound impolite, but avoid shaking hands with someone who has a streaming cold.
  4. Avoid stress.  Stress lowers the immune system.
  5. Get lots of shut eyes.  Lack of sleep makes you tired and run down, therefore your resistance to virus is in an all- time- low.
  6. This is strange but according to research the more friends you have the less likely you will catch a cold.  The more social you are the more resistance you are to viruses.  But there is a catch, the friends should be those ones who you mingle with personally and not just in Facebook friends. lol  This has probably has something to do with the level of endorphins, the happy hormones.
  7. The best prevention of cold and flu is the intensity and frequency of making love.  The more frequent you make love (at least once a week) the stronger and higher your immune-system molecules you’ll have.  It was found that these molecules are called immunoglobuln A which is important in protecting the mucous membranes from pesky viruses.

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Sept 2015:

It has been found that lack of sleep increases risk of catching the cold virus.  Those who sleep 6 hours or less a night, have a 4.2 times more chance of developing the cold symptoms.  So if you had a bad night and now sitting in a public transport near a sneezing commuter, change seats at once! 😉

Diet & Depression

What we eat can affect our moods and general health. We should, therefore, watch what we consume foodwise, drinkwise or even drugwise. Be wise.

Below is an article from NHS.uk which I think we should all know as everyone of us at one point of our lives will suffer from depression (from mild to debilitating one).

Healthy eating and depression

Feeling down or depressed can affect both your appetite and your daily routine.

Some people don’t feel like eating when they’re depressed and are at risk of becoming underweight. Others find comfort in food and can put on excess weight. Antidepressants can also affect your appetite.

If you’re concerned about weight loss, weight gain or how antidepressants are affecting your appetite, talk to your GP.

Tips for eating a healthy diet

Research into the links between diet and depression is ongoing. As yet, there is not enough evidence to say for certain that some foods help relieve symptoms of depression.

However, a healthy balanced diet is important for maintaining good general health.

“The most important thing is to eat regularly and to include the main food groups in your daily diet,” says Dr Lynn Harbottle, consultant in nutrition and dietetics at the Health and Social Services Department in Guernsey.

A diet based on starchy foods, such as rice and pasta, with plenty of fruit and vegetables, some protein-rich foods such as meat, fish and lentils, and some milk and dairy foods (and not too much fat, salt or sugar) will give you all the nutrients you need.

Find out more about the five food groups by looking at the eatwell plate. Also, read more about how to have a balanced diet.

There are many simple ways to improve your diet. However, if you’re more severely depressed and feel unable to shop or prepare food, see your GP to discuss the types of treatment and support that are available.

Eat regular meals

Have three meals every day, including breakfast. Breakfast can help give you the energy you need to face the day. Try a bowl of wholegrain cereal with some sliced banana and a glass of fruit juice for a healthy start to the day. If you feel hungry between meals, have a healthier snack such as a piece of fruit.

Eat more wholegrain cereals, fruit, vegetables, beans, lentils, nuts and seeds

These foods are a good source of vitamins and minerals. Try to eat at least five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day.

Include some protein at every meal

Protein is essential for the growth and repair of the body. You can get it from meat, fish, eggs, milk, cheese, lentils and beans.

Don’t get thirsty

We need to drink about 1.2 litres of fluid a day to stop us getting dehydrated. Even mild dehydration can affect our mood. Symptoms of dehydration include lack of energy and feeling light-headed. Find out more about how much you should drink, including how to choose healthier drinks.

If you drink alcohol, drink within the recommended daily limits

If you’re a man, don’t regularly drink more than three-to-four units a day. If you’re a woman, don’t regularly drink more than two-to-three units a day. Use our alcohol unit calculator to find out how many units there are in different types of alcoholic drinks. Don’t drink alcohol if you’re taking antidepressants.

When you make changes to your diet, set yourself realistic and achievable goals. Lynn warns against crash or miracle diets that might not be nutritionally balanced. Instead, make moderate changes. If you want to make major changes to your diet, see your GP, who can refer you to a registered dietitian.

Further information about diet and mental wellbeing

For general advice on healthy eating, see our food and diet section.

The energy diet has information about how healthy eating can help prevent tiredness.

Many treatment options are available for depression, including talking therapies, antidepressant medication and various self-help techniques. Find out more about treatment for depression.

If you’ve been feeling low for more than two weeks, see your GP to find out about treatment choices and to get advice on which might be most suitable for you.

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/pages/healthy-diet-depression.aspx

Page last reviewed: 06/01/2014

Next review due: 06/01/2016

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

Be careful if you are about to travel into the Middle East.  There is a virus that is going round, liken to SARS, which can be fatal.

Observe proper precautions especially on hygiene.  WASH THOSE HANDS with alcohol-based handwash, frequently.

Get away from coughing and sneezing people when travelling into the Middle East.

Stay away from crowded places.

JUST BE SAFE

JPJhermes, Nagpapatrol
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Pinoy nurse tests positive for MERS virus, first case in PHL
By IBARRA MATEOApril 16, 2014
4:43pm

A Filipino male nurse has been confirmed to be the first reported case of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus in the Philippines, Health Secretary Enrique Ona announced Wednesday.

The nurse, who was exposed to the Filipino paramedic who died from MERS last week in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), had been tested while he was there and the positive results came out upon his arrival in the country on Tuesday, Ona said.

He did not attend to the patient who died and did not exhibit any symptoms of the disease upon arrival, Ona added.

The nurse returned to the Philippines with his wife, two children, and helper, Ona said. Five people fetched them from the airport, and all of them were quarantined due to possible exposure to the MERS virus.

The virus has a 10- to 14-day incubation period, and the results of new tests done by the Department of Health (DOH) are expected to be available by Friday, Ona said.

“Hindi pa ito talagang confirmed na results kaya we need to do some more tests kasi tawagan lang ang nangyari sa UAE. That’s also the reason bakit quinarantine natin sila,” Ona said during the briefing.

The DOH is now conducting “contact tracing” of 12 passengers seated near the male nurse inside the plane to find out if they were exposed to the virus, he added.

“It will certainly depend on the seat arrangement if he is in the middle we have to trace those in the front or back. At the same time, we will check other people na nagkaroon ng possible contact,” said Dr. Emmanuel Labella, director of the Bureau of Quarantine, at the same briefing.

MERS is a novel virus often referred to as the Middle East’s own version of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Symptoms of MERS include fever, cough, shortness of breath, and even diarrhea. It was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/357189/news/nation/pinoy-nurse-tests-positive-for-mers-virus-first-case-in-phl

Singing & COPD

What a marvellous finding, I am all for it.  I think I am beginning to develop a sort of chonic cough myself.  Everyone in my family knows that they have to get me a glass of water when I start coughing.  My grandson Nathan, knows to get me water.  Funny enough, Nathan loves drinking water too,  he would bring in two glasses of water, one for me and one for him, he is an adorable 4 year old sweetheart.

I supposed it is time to dust off the old karaoke machine and get singing.  I might ask Peter nicely to sing with me.  He does have a lovely voice, when he tries.

I do love singing.  Every Filipino loves singing, it is in our blood.  I  remember in the early 80s before the karaoke machine had a stranglehold of  amateur singing, we use to buy what is called a minus one, instrumental music of the latest hits which you can sing to.  I remember buying a minus one of Michael Jackson’s Thriller.

Oh yeah, I was singing to Billy Jean all the time.

Maestro, I’d like sing “The Greatest Love of All”
Jean

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8 December 2013 Last updated at 00:07

Belting out a tune ‘helps those struggling to breathe’

By Anna LaceyBBC Health Check

Singing can help people cope with COPD

Around the world an estimated 64 million people are struggling to breathe on a daily basis. But could a simple sing-song bring the relief they are looking for?

“If I want to walk any distance then I find a landmark about 15 paces away, make for that and stop to get my breath,” says Jane Petto, who lives near Tunbridge Wells in Kent.

“And if I see stairs – just looking at them tires me out. They take forever.”

Jane is one of millions of people worldwide who suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, or COPD.

It is a lifelong condition caused by damage to the air sacs and passages that make up the lungs – and can make breathing a constant battle.

The World Health Organization expects COPD to be the third leading cause of death by 2030.

But despite having a profound impact on her daily life, there is one activity that gives Jane some respite – singing.

“Start Quote

If I see stairs, just looking at them tires me out. They take forever.”

Jane PettoCOPD sufferer

“When you’ve got COPD, breathing is on your mind all the time. But strangely I don’t notice it when I’m singing. I can hold a note for ages,” she says.

Surprising as it may sound, it has long been suspected that singing can help people with breathing difficulties.

But now a new long-term study on COPD and singing from Canterbury Christ Church University in Kent has shown that the benefits are real.

Dr Ian Morrison, a senior research fellow and one of the project’s authors, said: “Lung function improved dramatically, particularly after about five months, once people had got used to what they were doing and changed their breathing habits.”

“To get such an improvement really was quite remarkable.”

Take a deep breathJoining a choir is by no means a conventional solution for such a serious illness.

But the research team felt they had good reason to investigate its effects.

Dr Morrison says that people with breathing problems tend to develop a lot of anxiety about the very process of inhaling.

“The tendency is to do ‘gaspy’ breathing so they’re taking short little breaths.

“This actually fills up the lungs without clearing them, making it even more difficult to breathe.”

Due to their obstructed airways, many people with COPD already find emptying their lungs a challenge.

Fill your lungs: the art of breathing

Healthy right lung
  • Trained singers can hold notes for longer than the average person because they know how to optimise their lung capacity.
  • Vocal coach Claire Alsop suggests visualising your lungs expanding by holding your arms in front of you like a ballerina, and moving them outwards as you breathe out.
  • Keep the shoulders down and knees “bouncy”, not locked, feet slightly apart at a “ten to two” position (like the hands on a clock).
  • Breathe out with a “tffff” sound – feel your diaphragm pushing the air out.
  • Extraordinary feats of lung control include A-ha’s Morten Harket, whose 20.2 second sung note on ‘Summer Moved On’ is believed to be the longest in pop history. This beats Bill Withers’ note on ‘Lovely Day’ by just over 2 seconds.

Gasping makes the problem worse and can, in the most serious cases, lead to a build-up of carbon dioxide in the blood, which can result in respiratory failure.

In contrast, the techniques used in singing encourage people to breathe in a much deeper, more controlled manner.

“The whole musculature around the lungs, throat and the upper chest improve with time,” says Dr Morrison.

“They use what they have much better and you really see a difference in the skill of actually breathing.”

To test its effects, Morrison and his colleagues asked over 100 COPD patients – ranging from mild to severely affected – to attend weekly singing sessions over a 12-month period.

They measured their lung capacity with a device known as a spirometer – which looks a bit like a giant breathalyser – and asked participants to fill in a questionnaire to find out on a qualitative level how they were feeling.

One of the tests involved measuring how much air a person could force out in a rapid puff.

“On average the people in our study had 50% of expected lung function,” said Prof Stephen Clift, the study’s lead author.

“That means about 1.5 litres of air in a one second puff. For healthy lungs, we would expect something more like 3 litres.”

Without treatment, people with COPD can expect to see the size of their puff decrease by around 40ml a year.

The very best the team had hoped for was that after singing regularly for one year, the size of that puff would stay the same.

“Instead we got an increase of 30ml,” says Prof Clift.

“Although the changes are small, the progressive nature of COPD means that any loss of function year-on-year is going to be more significant for them.

“In our study, we not only appeared to halt the decline but people showed a small improvement.”

Dr Morrison added: “There’s also the social and psychological side, because any long term condition is isolating.

“So if people can get out and do things and get peer support, then their wellbeing improves as well.”

‘Singing on prescription’

In terms of treating COPD, the study’s results are enticing.

What is COPD?

Lady coughing while doctor listens to her lungs with a stethoscope
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is an umbrella term which includes the conditions chronic bronchitis and emphysema
  • Inflammation to the airways causes narrowing, making it difficult to breathe
  • Symptoms include a chesty cough, breathlessness, wheezing, anxiety and sometimes depression
  • Because the lungs are sensitive, COPD patients should avoid traffic fumes, cigarette smoke, perfume, hairspray and extremes of temperature

Of the deaths predicted by the WHO, most will occur in low- and middle-income countries.

The beauty of singing is that whether you’re Tom Jones or tone deaf, anyone can strike up a tune anywhere they please – for free.

Cooking in indoor stoves and working in dusty places can lead to COPD, but by far the biggest risk factor is cigarette smoking.

It accounts for 80% of COPD cases worldwide, and quitting smoking is the best advice, according to Dr Penny Woods, chief executive of the British Lung Foundation.

“COPD is a chronic disease and it cannot be cured – the damage is irreversible.

“However, someone already diagnosed with COPD could greatly decrease the progression of the disease if they give up smoking, helping them maintain a better quality of life for longer.”

The study’s authors certainly do not claim that singing can cure COPD or be an alternative to interventions such as giving up smoking.

But Dr Morrison thinks that it could be a useful tool in helping people to manage the condition and live with it day to day.

“Deep down, what we’re looking for is singing on prescription for various long-term conditions,” he says.

“However this was only a feasibility study so it wasn’t randomised and there wasn’t a control. But we can now set up a controlled trial where some people sing, some people don’t and that would be even more powerful way of showing these good results.”

But volunteers like Jane are already convinced that singing has made a difference.

She said: “I was diagnosed with COPD 17 years ago and then 13 years ago I was diagnosed with lung cancer as well so I had my right lung out.

“Surviving as I have with everything that’s gone against me, I put it down to singing.

“I’ve been involved with singing all my life and there’s so much going on with the words and the harmony that you’re not thinking about breathing at all. But yet the breathing is working.”

 

Hippocrates

I think the internet is in the top 10 of best inventions of all times.

Thanks to Tim Bernes-Lee, inventor of the worldwide web, almost any information is just a click of a button away.

This morning I suddenly got to thinking of Hippocrates.

Having watched many hospital drama, I am more or less aware of the Hippocratic oath where you have to be respectful of the patient’s life above all else whether he is a friend or a foe, irrespective of what he has done, of his religion or politics etc.

Below is a witty article about the Hippocratic Oath

Jean
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A guide to the Hippocratic Oath

By Dr Daniel Sokol
Medical ethicist

Hippocrates

Hippocrates: the father of modern medicine?

When I asked my medical students to name famous doctors in the history of medicine, their first answer was Harold Shipman, the GP who murdered hundreds of patients.

I nearly swallowed my tongue.

Their second answer was House, the fictional doctor from the American TV series.

Tears of frustration welled up in my eyes.

Their third answer was Hippocrates, presumed author of the Hippocratic Oath – I breathed a sigh of relief.

Written nearly 2,500 years ago, the Oath is the most famous text in Western medicine, yet most people (including doctors) know precious little about it.

One GP recounted the story of an elderly patient who believed the Oath instructed doctors never to tell patients the truth. It contains no such advice.

Here is a brief guide to the Oath.

The Oath starts: “I swear by Apollo the physician and by Asclepius and Hygieia and Panacea… to bring the following oath to fulfilment.”

Apollo, the god of healing, fell in love with a human, Coronis.

I will use treatments for the benefit of the ill in accordance with my ability and my judgment, but from what is to their harm and injustice I will keep them
Hippocratic Oath

In his absence, Apollo sent a white crow to look after her.

When the crow informed Apollo that Coronis loved another man, Apollo’s rage turned the crow black.

To avenge her brother, Apollo’s sister shot Coronis with an arrow and, as she lay dying, Coronis told Apollo that she was bearing his child.

Although Apollo could not save Coronis, he rescued the unborn child, Asclepius.

Hygieia, the goddess of health, and Panacea, the goddess of cures, are the daughters of Asclepius.

According to legend, Hippocrates was a descendant of one of Asclepius’ sons.

Inspiration

Doctors taking the Oath would doubtless have been inspired by this illustrious lineage of healers.

The next section instructs the doctor to treat his teachers as his parents, and to pass on the art of medicine to the next generation of healers.

In a pure and holy way, I will guard my life and my art and science
Hippocratic Oath

The Oath continues: “And I will use treatments for the benefit of the ill in accordance with my ability and my judgment, but from what is to their harm and injustice I will keep them.”

In other words, doctors should act in the best interests of their patients, and when unjust circumstances arise – for instance, a certain life-prolonging drug may not be available on the NHS – they should strive to correct the injustice harming their patients.

The next part seemingly concerns euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, saying: “And I will not give a drug that is deadly to anyone if asked, nor will I suggest the way to such a counsel.”

Two leading scholars of the Oath, Littre and Miles, have however suggested that this passage alludes to the then common practice of using doctors as skilled political assassins.

Steven Miles notes: “Fear of the physician-poisoner may be traced very close to the time of the Oath.”

The word “euthanasia” (meaning “easeful death”) was only coined a century after the writing of the Oath.

Abortion

The text continues: “And likewise I will not give a woman a destructive pessary.”

This passage is often interpreted as a rejection of abortion.

However, abortion was legal at the time and the text only mentions pessaries (a soaked piece of wool inserted in the vagina to induce abortion), not the oral methods of abortion also used in ancient Greece.

As pessaries could cause lethal infections, the author of the Oath may have had a clinical objection to the method, rather than a moral objection to abortion itself.

The next sentence – “In a pure and holy way, I will guard my life and my art and science” – is a call for professional integrity.

Doctors should refrain from immoral behaviour and resist the temptations that accompany their privileged position (today, from drug companies offering generous gifts, for example).

Surgery

The Oath continues: “I will not cut, and certainly not those suffering from stone, but I will cede this to men who are practitioners of this activity.”

Another common misconception is that the Oath forbids surgery.

About whatever I may see or hear in treatment, or even without treatment, in the life of human beings, I will remain silent, holding such things to be unutterable
Hippocratic Oath

In fact, it instructs doctors to acknowledge the limits of their competence and to refer cases to more specialised practitioners.

Next, the doctor enters the patient’s house: “Into as many houses as I may enter, I will go for the benefit of the ill, while being far from all voluntary and destructive injustice, especially from sexual acts both upon women’s bodies and upon men’s.”

The need for such a statement reflects the wide distrust in healers at the time.

In a competitive marketplace where quacks abounded, it was necessary to reassure the public that doctors would not exploit patients.

Confidentiality

The penultimate section deals with confidentiality and reads: “And about whatever I may see or hear in treatment, or even without treatment, in the life of human beings, I will remain silent, holding such things to be unutterable.”

As today, patients in ancient times shared deeply personal information with doctors on the assumption that their details would not be revealed to others.

Without this trust, patients may withhold facts that would help the doctor make an accurate diagnosis.

The text ends with the rewards that await those who respect the Oath (“the benefits both of life and of art and science, being held in good repute among all human beings for time eternal”) and the punishment of those who do not (“if, however, I transgress and swear falsely, the opposite of these”).

This whistle-stop tour of the Oath gives some idea of the content and spirit of this ancient text.

In an age of technological developments, cosmetic surgery, complementary medicine, drug companies, and many other temptations for patients and doctors alike, the spirit of the Oath is as relevant as ever.

• Dr Daniel Sokol is a medical ethicist at St George’s, University of London, and Director of the Applied Clinical Ethics (ACE) programme at Imperial College, London.

 

 

 

I swear by Apollo the Physician and Asclepius and Hygeia and Panaceia and all the gods and goddesses, making them my witnesses, that I will fulfill according to my ability and judgment this oath and this covenant:

To hold him who has taught me this art as equal to my parent and to live my life in partnership with him, and if he is in need of money to give him a share of mine, and to regard his offspring as equal to my brothers in male lineage and to teach them this art—if they desire to learn it—without fee and covenant; to give share of precepts and oral instruction and all other learning to my sons and to the sons of him who has instructed me and to pupils who have signed the covenant and have taken an oath according to the medical law, but to no one else.

I will apply dietetic measure for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment; I will keep them from harm and injustice. I will neither give a deadly drug to anybody if asked for it, nor will I make a suggestion to this effect. Similarly I will not give a woman an abortive remedy. In purity and in holiness I will guard my life and my art.
I will not use the knife, not even on sufferers from stone, but will withdraw in favor of such men as are engaged in this work.

Whatever houses I may visit, I will come for the benefit of the sick, remaining free of all intentional injustice, of all mischief and in particular of sexual relations with both female and male persons, be they free or slaves.

What I may see or hear in the course of the treatment or even outside of the treatment in regard to the life of men, which on no account one must spread abroad, I will keep to myself holding such things shameful to be spoken about.

If I fulfill this oath and do not violate it, may it be granted to me to enjoy life and art, being honored with fame among all men for all time to come; if I transgress it and swear falsely, may the opposite be my lot.

—Translated by Ludwig Edelstein
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Extreme remedies are very appropriate for extreme diseases.
~Hippocrates
……….
To do nothing is sometimes a good remedy.
~Hippocrates

Vicks VapoRub

vicksI think my mother must be the number one   consumer of Vicks vaporub. 😉 We grew up on it. She nurtured us with it. 😉  For every ailment Vicks was never far away.  For headaches, Vicks was rubbed on the temple.  For coughs and colds, Vicks was rubbed on chest and back and nostril.  For sores, aches and pains, Vicks was rubbed on affected areas.

The smell of Vicks was as familiar as the smell of our favourite viand, the Adobo.

Vicks was an all around family medicine kit because it worked.

Now living in the UK, I always have a tub of Vicks VapoRub placed at an easy reach and I still swear by it.

 

TWELVE SURPRISING USES FOR VICKS VAPORUB

1. Decongest Your Chest
The most common use of Vicks is to decongest your chest and throat area. When applied to the upper chest, it provides excellent relief of cough and congestion symptoms.

2. On Your Tootsies
Applying Vicks to your feet provides nighttime cough relief. Generously rub VapoRub all over your feet and cover them with socks. Your cough will subside.

3. Achy Breaky Muscles
Vicks relieves sore, overworked muscles. It increases circulation and provides almost instant aid. Use a generous portion and apply it over the aching area.

4. Get Rid of Nasty Nail Fungus
Rub VapoRub on your toenails if you suspect you have a fungus. Within days, the nail will turn dark—this means the Vicks is killing the fungus. As your toenail grows out, the dark part will grow off and you will have fungus-free feet. Keep applying the ointment over a period of two weeks to fully cleanse nail beds of any remaining bacteria.

5. Stop Your Cat from Scratching
To prevent Miss Kitty from ruining your doors, walls, and windows, apply a small amount of VapoRub to these areas. Cats detest the smell and will steer clear. Vicks can also be applied to your arms and legs if your kitty is prone to scratching you.

6. Pet Pee-Pee Deterrent
If your dog or cat is not yet potty trained, put an open bottle of Vicks on the area he or she likes to mark as their territory. The smell will discourage them from lifting their legs and wetting your rug.

7. Headaches Be Gone
Rub a small amount of Vicks VapoRub on your temples and forehead to help relieve headaches. The mentholated scent will release pressure in your head and instantly
relieve pain.

8. Humidify Your Sleep
Vicks VapoRub can be used in special types of humidifiers and vaporizers. Ensure your humidifier has an aromatherapy compartment before using. The humidifier
will circulate Vicks throughout the air and keep you breathing easy all night long.

9. Paper Cuts and Splinters
To prevent infection and speed up healing time, dab a small amount of Vicks on any small cut or splinter.

10. Ticks and Bugs
If you get bitten by a tick, apply Vicks immediately. The strong odor might help get the critter to release itself and stop bugging you.

11. Reek-free Racehorses
Professional racers smother VapoRub under the nostrils of racehorses on race day. The strong stench deters the stallions from the alluring odor of the female pony and
keeps them focused on the race.

12. Go Away Mosquitoes (love this one!!!)
Apply small dabs of Vicks VapoRub to your skin and clothes and mosquitoes will steer clear. If you do get bitten, apply Vicks to the area and cover it with a Band-Aid to relieve itching. (Although this one didn’t work for me)
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