Category: Furniture & Fittings

Our Christmas Lights

Our Christmas Lights

Our home made Christmas  arch & lights

our Christmas arch with lights Our fibre optic lighted Xmas treeEach Christmas Jean &  I put up our home Christmas decorations we like to make sure we have many sets of lights festooned in our main rooms including the kitchen. 🙂 We also puts a string of lights around the yew tree in our front garden, but as it has grown over the year, we found that the lights are spread thin so we may need to get new longer ones next year!
Most of our Christmas decorations have their origin from 18th century Germany where candles were used. The Victorian era also introduced Christmas decorations and illuminated by lights were influenced by Queen Victoria’s beloved husband Prince Albert. With the coming of the electric age, many variations of various sized decorative bulbs evolving to use of LEDs also are now popular.

In the UK, Europe and other nations, having light whether by candle and lantern was essential to drive away the deep winter darkness. Christmas became the time to over-indulge with lights to celebrate the bright birth of Jesus.

venerable-45-year-old-family-tree.jpg

venerable-45-year-old-family-tree.jpg

 Our Christmas Lights

 

 

Medieval Stove at V&A Museum

Photo by P H Morton

Can you guess what the above is?

Medieval Stove at V&A Museum

At first glance and probably second you might think it is some kind of pulpit where you can deliver a sermon to patient congregation but actually this beautiful massive green tiled artifact is a Medieval stove built in Germany between 1577 – 1588.  This is currently in exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Museum.  It is worth a visit to see this piece of history which is in perfect condition.

This stove was used to heat a large room. It is move like a fireplace than an aga!

Chamber Pots

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Yes folks the above chamber pots are Irish and yes again, it is decorated by a very severe looking William Gladstone, one time Prime Minister of Great Britain.

The Irish reviled  Gladstone because he wanted to pacify  & disestablish the minority Church of Ireland, to reform the land laws and to amend the university system to rectify Catholic grievance. The strategy was based on the belief that the Irish problem was not a demand for independence but an amalgam of social and religious complaints.

So  protesters  could express their protest and their  patriotism by pissing all over Gladstone.  LOL

Chamber pots (possibly from pot de chambre – French for pot in a room), a gazunder (likely a contraction of “goes under”), a piss pot, a potty, or a thunder pot) is a bowl-shaped container with a handle, and often a lid, kept in the bedroom under a bed or in the base of  cabinet or nightstand next to the bed.  chamber pots  are generally used as a toilet  at night. In Victorian times, some chamber pots would be built into a cabinets with a closable cover.

They were used in households that had no proper inside toilet on bedroom floors or the toilet was located outside next or near the home.  They could be decorative and ornate made of china, metal etc.Also when the weather was extremely cold, family members preferred to not wander from their bedrooms to the toilet. The maids in richer homes had the unedifying task in the mornings to attend the bedrooms and empty the pots into a larger bucket then carry it  and pour of down the  main toilet.

My husband’s family house in the early 1960s had a outside toilet next to the back door (later converted into an inside toilet) as a household chore, he would have to empty the family pots too 🙁

Early use of chamber  pots are recorded in ancient Greece  used in at least since the 6th century BC and were known under different names such as  ἀμίς (amis), – ouron, “urine”

The introduction of indoor toilets particularly near bedrooms(mainly in bathrooms)  started to displace chamber pots in the 19th century but such pots were in common use until the mid-20th century.

Chamber pots continue in use today in countries lacking indoor plumbing such as rural areas of China, and have been redesigned as the bed pan for use with the very ill.

In the UK and North America, the affectionate term “potty” is often used when discussing the toilet  with small children – such as during potty training . It is also usually used to refer to the small, toilet-shaped devices made especially for potty training, which are quite similar to chamber pots. These “potties” are generally a large plastic bowl with an ergonomically designed back and front to protect against splashes.

In the Philippines chamber pots are used as urinals and are commonly called arinola.

Today ornate Victorian chamber pots are sought after for antique value and other uses such as decorative flower pots

Especially in Britain jokes and humour about bodily functions are popular and we call toilet humour 😉

 

Victorian toilet with chamber pot (Sherlock Holmes Museum) Photo by Jean

Victorian toilet with chamber pot (Sherlock Holmes Museum) Photo by Jean

 

Humourrous pot!

humourous pot!

Legend has it that following a wedding the young men brought a chamber pot of onion soup for the newly weds. So as not to waken them they climbed a wall into the garden and in so doing they broke the chamber pot. The newly weds therefore never got the soup, but the name of the street was changed: the chamber pot was broken but not forgotten!

Unusual name of a street in St Etienne, France.  Legend has it that following a wedding the young men brought a chamber pot of onion soup for the newly weds. So as not to waken them they climbed a wall into the garden and in so doing they broke the chamber pot. The newly weds therefore never got the soup, but the name of the street was changed: the chamber pot was broken but its name not forgotten!