Category: Saints

Draw Me After You!

Skyrider, photo by PH Morton

Draw Me After You!

Draw me after You!

We will run in the fragrance of Your perfumes,

O heavenly Spouse

I will run and not tire,

until You bring me into the wine-cellar,

until Your left hand is under my head

and Your right hand will embrace me happily

You will kiss me with the happiest

Kiss of your mouth.

~Saint Clare of Assisi

…..

St Clare of Assisi is rather too familiar with God! ūüôā

You Are Christ’s Hand

Christ of St John of the Cross

You Are Christ’s Hand

Christ has no body now on earth but yours,

    no hands but yours,

    no feet but yours,

Yours are the eyes through which is to look out

¬† ¬†Christ’s compassion to the world

Yours are the feet with which he is to go about doing good;

Yours are the hands with which he is to bless men now.

    – Saint Teresa of Avila
    ……
    This is such a beautiful message from St Teresa. ¬†We are God’s representative on Earth. ¬†Unfortunately in my case, I might not be worthy, I being all too human. ūüôĀ

Saint Scholastica

Death of St Scholastica by Johann Baptist Wenzel Bergl

Saint Scholastica

Saint Scholastica (Santa Scholastica) is said to be the twin sister of St Benedict, the founder of Western monasticism. She is a saint recognised by the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Churches.

The twins came from a very affluent family of Norcia (Nursia), in the province of Perugia, southwestern of Umbria, Italy.

The twins were quite religious from an early age.  They were inseparable until St Benedict had to leave for Rome for further studies.

Later on after St Benedict founded his first monastery in Monte Cassino, St Scholastica also headed a female version (nuns) of the Benedictine monastery just a few miles from Monte Cassino.

St Scholastica Reliquary, V&A Museum, photo by JMorton

The above is a reliquary, a container of holy relics.  The hand is shown holding a bird, which is reminiscent of how St Benedict saw the soul/spirit of his dead sister as she ascended into heaven in the form of a dove.

The above St Scholastica reliquary was made from silver and originated in Spain and now proudly displayed at the Victroria and Albert Museum. ¬†It is quite spectacular. ¬†The little glass hole was once used to view the relic from St Scholastica’s left arm.

St Scholastica is the patron saint of nuns, convulsive children, schools, tests, books, reading (there are many schools and colleges named after St Scholastica).  She is also the saint to invoke against storms and rain.

There was a mystical  story regarding St Scholastica and St Benedict.  Apparently the twins met up once a year in an inn inbetween their respective monasteries.

St Scholastica begged her brother to stay with her for the evening so they can continue praying and discussing religious matters.  But St Benedict refused; he was adamant, he had a rule of spending the nights in his cell in his monastery.

With clasped hands, St Scholastica prayed in earnest, there was suddenly heavy rain and storm, making it impossible for St Benedict to leave.

St Benedict was not very pleased! Benedict asked, “What have you done?”, to which she replied, “I asked you and you would not listen; so I asked my God and he did listen. So now go off, if you can, leave me and return to your monastery.” Benedict was unable to return to his monastery, and they spent the night in discussion.[

Three days later, St Scholastica passed away; St Benedict saw the dove flying into the heavenly blue yonder instinctively knowing that it was his sister.

St Benedict ordered for his sister’s body to be brought into his monastery for burial in the space he allotted for himself. ¬†In the end they were buried together as St Benedict also passed away not too long after.

Her feast day is 10 February!

Saint David’s Day

Saint David’s Day

 

March 1st ¬†is Saint David’s Day.

Did you remember to celebrate it yesterday?

The first day of March was chosen in remembrance of the death of Saint David as traditionally it is believed that he might have died on that day in 569, 588 or even 589; the date is uncertain.

Stainglass picture of St David of Wales

Stainglass depicting St David of Wales

St David (Dewi Sant) was a Celtic monk, abbot and bishop, who lived in the sixth century.  He spread the word of Christianity across Wales.

St David's own flag flown over Churches and some public buildings on St David's Day

St David’s own flag flown over Churches and some public buildings on St David’s Day

A  famous story about Saint David tells how he was preaching to a huge crowd and the ground is said to have risen up, so that he was standing on a hill and everyone had a better chance of hearing and seeing him.

¬†He was born towards the end of the 5th century. He was¬†of the royal house of Ceredigion, and founded a Celtic monastic community at Glyn Rhosyn (The Vale of Roses) on the western headland of Pembrokeshire (Sir Benfro) where St David’s Cathedral¬†¬†stands today. David was famous for being a teacher. ¬†His monastery at Glyn Rhosin became an important Christian shrine and important centre in Wales. Before ¬†his death, Saint David is said to have uttered these words: “Brothers be ye constant. The yoke¬†which with single mind ye have taken, bear ye to the end; and whatsoever ye have seen with me and heard, keep and fulfil.”

Welsh ex-pats around the ¬†world celebrate St David’s Day. The ¬†daffodil ¬†& the leek are the national emblem of Wales and badges of which are worn with pride.

Daffodil flower and emblem of Wales

Daffodil flower and emblem of Wales

Why a leek as an emblem?  One theory is that St David advised the Welsh, on the eve of battle with the Saxons, to wear leeks in their caps to distinguish friend from the enemy. Shakespeare mentions in Henry V, that the Welsh archers (fearsome for the power and accuracy of their legendary long bows,)  wore leeks at the battle  with the French at Agincourt in 1415.

The Leek vegetbale an other emblem of Wales

The Leek vegetable an other emblem of Wales

The traditional meal on St David’s Day is cawl. This is a soup that is made of leek and other locally grown produce.

Another symbol of Wales is ¬†the iconic Welsh Dragon ¬†in Welsh-¬†Y Ddraig Goch¬†(“the red dragon”)

Welsh National-Flag

The Welsh National Flag

It  appears on the national flag of Wales. The flag is also called Y Ddraig Goch.

The Historia Brittonum(History of Britons written around 828)  records the first  use of the dragon to  symbolise Wales.

The Dragon was popularly supposed to have been the battle standard of the legendary King Arthur¬†¬†other ancient Celtic¬†leaders. archaeological ¬†literature, and documentary history suggests that ¬†it evolved from an earlier Romano-British national symbol.¬†¬†During the reigns of the ¬†Tudor Monarchs, the red dragon was used as a symbol of support¬†¬†in the English Crown’s coat of arms (one of two supporters, along with the traditional English lion).¬†¬†The red dragon is often seen as symbolising all things Welsh, and flags are flown ¬†by many public and private institutions in Wales and some in London too.

………………..

1 March 2014

To celebrate St David’s Day Google has this special doodle to commemorate the occasion.

st-davids-day-2014-5651391519391744.2-hp

 

 

St Peter, First Apostle

St Peter (V&A), Photo by PH Morton

St Peter (V&A), Photo by PH Morton

St Peter, First Apostle

Peter was originally called Simon (Simeon).¬† Jesus changed Simon’s name to Peter, the Greek translation of the Aramaic, ‘rock’ in anticipation of Peter’s major role as the leader of the disciples and the first church of Jerusalem.

Before Peter became a disciple, he was a fisherman together with his brother, Andrew.  He was also married.

Peter was a very interesting disciple.  He was the first disciple chosen by Jesus.  Though he was a willing one, he often questioned his faith.

He admitted his unworthiness and guilt when he had to deny knowing Christ three times as the cock crowed and when he was being examined by the Jewish council.

He was crucified in Rome head downwards.

Bartholomew, The Apostle

 Artist: Carlo Crivelli Completion Date: c.1475

Artist: Carlo Crivelli
Completion Date: c.1475

Bartholomew, The Apostle

There is a bit of an issue with St Bartholomew’s name.¬† Apparently it is widely believed that he and the apostle Nathanael were one and the same.¬† He was an Israelite,¬†who was without guile; what you saw was what you got.

St Bartholomew was believed to have travelled as far as India and then Armenia to spread and preach the Gospel

It was in Armenia, where he became a martyr.  He was flayed (skinned) alive and then beheaded.

His portraits often depict him holding a knife, with which he was flayed.

His feast day is 24 August.

He is the patron saint of Armenia. Yes.

St Bartholomew is the protectors of plasterers (he was once one), tailors, furriers, binders, butchers, tanners, house painters, stewards and glove makers.

%d bloggers like this: