Category: Engineers

Artificial Intelligence – Death of Mankind

I agree with Stephen Hawkings on this one.  My smartphone alone will be the death of me.  It autocorrects my messages.  It automatically change my sometimes funny but nonsensical comments into downright stupid ones.  It is killing my reputation and gathering me some very unhappy friends. 😉

I also find that machines, which are supposed to make life easier are anything but.  I now have less and less free time as technology improves more and more.

My social life now consists of me and my Facebook friends and Twitter followers.  🙂  Of course I love every single one of them.  Some of them give me gifts for my Farmville, Sugar Crush and help me with my Pet Saga, but surely there is more to life than a mouse, keyboard and a small screen and of course a capricious internet connection?

JPJhermes

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Artificial Intelligence – Death of Mankind

Stephen Hawking warns artificial intelligence could end mankind

Stephen Hawking: “Humans, who are limited by slow biological evolution, couldn’t compete and would be superseded”

Prof Stephen Hawking, one of Britain’s pre-eminent scientists, has said that efforts to create thinking machines pose a threat to our very existence.

He told the BBC:”The development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race.”

His warning came in response to a question about a revamp of the technology he uses to communicate, which involves a basic form of AI.

But others are less gloomy about AI’s prospects.

The theoretical physicist, who has the motor neurone disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is using a new system developed by Intel to speak.

Machine learning experts from the British company Swiftkey were also involved in its creation. Their technology, already employed as a smartphone keyboard app, learns how the professor thinks and suggests the words he might want to use next.

Prof Hawking says the primitive forms of artificial intelligence developed so far have already proved very useful, but he fears the consequences of creating something that can match or surpass humans.

HAL 2001Stanley Kubrick’s film 2001 and its murderous computer HAL encapsulate many people’s fears of how AI could pose a threat to human life

“It would take off on its own, and re-design itself at an ever increasing rate,” he said.

CelverbotCleverbot is software that is designed to chat like a human would

“Humans, who are limited by slow biological evolution, couldn’t compete, and would be superseded.”

But others are less pessimistic.

“I believe we will remain in charge of the technology for a decently long time and the potential of it to solve many of the world problems will be realised,” said Rollo Carpenter, creator of Cleverbot.

Cleverbot’s software learns from its past conversations, and has gained high scores in the Turing test, fooling a high proportion of people into believing they are talking to a human.

Rise of the robots

Mr Carpenter says we are a long way from having the computing power or developing the algorithms needed to achieve full artificial intelligence, but believes it will come in the next few decades.

“We cannot quite know what will happen if a machine exceeds our own intelligence, so we can’t know if we’ll be infinitely helped by it, or ignored by it and sidelined, or conceivably destroyed by it,” he says.

But he is betting that AI is going to be a positive force.

Prof Hawking is not alone in fearing for the future.

In the short term, there are concerns that clever machines capable of undertaking tasks done by humans until now will swiftly destroy millions of jobs.

Elon MuskElon Musk, chief executive of rocket-maker Space X, also fears artificial intelligence

In the longer term, the technology entrepreneur Elon Musk has warned that AI is “our biggest existential threat”.

Robotic voice

In his BBC interview, Prof Hawking also talks of the benefits and dangers of the internet.

He quotes the director of GCHQ’s warning about the net becoming the command centre for terrorists: “More must be done by the internet companies to counter the threat, but the difficulty is to do this without sacrificing freedom and privacy.”

He has, however, been an enthusiastic early adopter of all kinds of communication technologies and is looking forward to being able to write much faster with his new system.

Prof Stephen Hawking and Rory Cellan-JonesProf Hawking is using new software to speak, but has opted to keep the same voice

But one aspect of his own tech – his computer generated voice – has not changed in the latest update.

Prof Hawking concedes that it’s slightly robotic, but insists he didn’t want a more natural voice.

“It has become my trademark, and I wouldn’t change it for a more natural voice with a British accent,” he said.

“I’m told that children who need a computer voice, want one like mine.”

Gravity Power

 

newtonThe genius of Isaac Newton, who in the 17th  century defined gravity and produced a universal law of gravitation laid down the foundations for scientists, theoretical physicists such as Einstein.

Gravity Power

Gravity is pervasive, it affects and influences us all on our planet, in our solar system  and in our universe.

einstein1Astronomy is a hobby/interest of mine I like to learn all about what happens in the cosmos and how our space probes/telescopes are unlocking secrets preciously hidden to us.   Below Ben Gilliland excellently explains how gravity helps  push back the frontiers of space

WE ARE USED TO THINKING OF SPACE FLIGHT as a struggle against gravity. After all, it takes vast, towering rockets filled with hundreds of tonnes of explosive liquids and gases just to give a light-aircraft-sized vehicle enough thrust to break free of the bonds of Earth’s gravity.

Even if you are lucky enough make it into space, there are still endless gravitational hurdles to overcome. Contrary to what Sir Isaac Newton believed, gravity isn’t caused by two massive objects pulling on one-another. Instead, gravity is a by-product of the dents and distortions made by massive objects in the fabric of the Universe. A truly massive object, like a planet, makes a pretty big dent and, when a less massive object, like a spacecraft, strays too close it finds itself ‘falling’ into that dent – it might look as if the spacecraft is being ‘pulled’ towards the planet, but really it is ‘falling’ towards it.

The Solar System is littered with these gravitational pitfalls – a satellite falls towards the Earth, the Earth falls towards the Sun and, in turn, the Sun falls towards the centre of the Milky Way. The only way to stop this fall from becoming a direct plunge is to move through space fast enough to ensure your momentum keeps you aloft.

You can think of the Sun’s gravity as being a little like a wine glass. If you drop an olive into the glass, it will fall straight to the bottom, but, if you spin the glass, you can give the olive enough momentum to roll around the sides without falling in (like a planet orbiting the Sun). Decrease the momentum and its orbit will fall closer; increase it and its orbit moves further away. If you continue to increase the speed, eventually the olive will move so fast that it will achieve ‘escape velocity’ and fly from the glass.

A spacecraft leaving Earth has been given enough momentum to escape Earth’s gravity wine glass, but, if it wants to travel into deep space, it has to find enough momentum to escape the Sun’s gravitational dent. Using rockets isn’t practical because they’d need so much heavy fuel it would be prohibitively expensive to just leave the Earth –so scientists came up with a clever trick called a ‘gravity assist’ manoeuvre,

Also known as the ‘slingshot’ manoeuvre, the technique was first used successfully 40 years ago this week, by Nasa’s Mariner 10 Mercury probe. Instead of struggling against the gravitational pull of the planets, during a gravity assist, a spacecraft uses a planet’s gravity (or a series of planets) to give it a speed boost. By falling towards a planet that is falling towards the Sun, a spacecraft can ‘steal’ enough momentum to travel against the Sun’s gravitational pull.

So you could say that spaceflight isn’t flying at all: it’s just falling, with style.

 

 

A spacecraft leaving Earth has been given enough momentum to escape Earth’s gravity wine glass, but, if it wants to travel into deep space, it has to find enough momentum to escape the Sun’s gravitational dent. Using rockets isn’t practical because they’d need so much heavy fuel it would be prohibitively expensive to just leave the Earth –so scientists came up with a clever trick called a ‘gravity assist’ manoeuvre,

Also known as the ‘slingshot’ manoeuvre, the technique was first used successfully 40 years ago this week, by Nasa’s Mariner 10 Mercury probe. Instead of struggling against the gravitational pull of the planets, during a gravity assist, a spacecraft uses a planet’s gravity (or a series of planets) to give it a speed boost. By falling towards a planet that is falling towards the Sun, a spacecraft can ‘steal’ enough momentum to travel against the Sun’s gravitational pull.

So you could say that spaceflight isn’t flying at all: it’s just falling, with style.

The Amazing Story of British Science

The British have a remarkable talent for keeping calm, even when there is no crisis.

– Franklin F. Jones

 

From the 1700s Britain, this small group of islands was and still is a leader in science and engineering. Surely Sir Isaac Newton must be regarded as the greatest scientist that ever lived. He formulated the laws or motion and gravity, proved that sun light was not pure white but made up of colour and corpuscular(tiny particles of matter)when he produced a spectrum via two prisms and isolated one colour. He invented the reflecting telescope and for mathematics he invented calculus still a valuable mathematic tool today. His discoveries about energy gravity and motion laid the ground for Einstein.

Below is an article about an excellent new BBC TV series charting the successes and discoveries made by British scientists and engineers.

The Amazing Story of British Science

Sir Isaac Newton, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Sir Tim Berners-Lee. Pictures via Getty

Britons Sir Isaac Newton, Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Sir Tim Berners-Lee all changed the world through their discoveries and inventions

Science Britannica 
Professor Brian Cox
Scientist and presenter

The British Isles are home to just one percent of the world’s population and yet our small collection of rocks poking out of the north Atlantic has thrown up world beaters in virtually every field of human endeavour.

Nowhere is this more obvious than in science and engineering. Edward Jenner came up with vaccines, Sir Frank Whittle ushered in the jet age and Sir Tim Berners-Lee laid the foundations of the world wide web for the Internet. Sir Isaac Newton, Robert Boyle, Charles Darwin, Michael Faraday, George Stephenson, James Watt, Isambard Kingdom Brunel (engineer), Francis Crick ( co discoverer of DNA)… the list is gloriously long.  We can now add Peter Higgs,who proposed the so called ‘God particle’ Higgs Bosun a field that holds particles together, which if if did not exist , sub atomic particles would never had formed into atoms and ultilmately us! The Higgs Bosun has been tentatively discovered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

What is it about Britain that allowed so many great minds to emerge and flourish?

This is a very important question to ask, because science and engineering are not only part of our past – the future of our economy depends to an ever-increasing extent on our continued excellence in scientific discovery and high-tech manufacturing and engineering.

The roots of our success can be traced back many centuries. Oxford and Cambridge Universities were formed over 800 years ago.

They paved the way for the world’s oldest scientific institution, The Royal Society, formed in 1660 by a group including Sir Christopher Wren, professor of astronomy and architect of St Paul’s Cathedral in London.

Science Heroes

 Robert Boyle Boyle 1627 – 1691 is one of  founders of modern chemistry and one of the pioneers of modern experimental scientific method which Britain gave to the world.  He is best known for Boyles Law  which describes the inversely proportional relationship between the absolute pressure and volume of a gas, if the temperature is kept constant within a closed sytem.

Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) was a brilliant physicist and mathematician who is considered a founding father of science.

Charles Darwin (1809 – 1882) was a naturalist and geologist who came up with the world-changing theory of evolution.

Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-1859) was an inventor and engineer who designed some of the UK’s most famous tunnels, bridges, railway lines and ships

Sir Frank Whittle (1907 – 1996) was a daredevil test pilot who is credited with inventing the turbo jet engine

Sir Tim Berners-Lee (1955 – ) is the inventor of the world wide web

Scientist Rosalind Franklin’s photograph’s of X Ray diffraction of DNA confirmed it’s double helix structure

Any theory or idea about the world should be tested and if it disagrees with observations, then it is wrong.

Even today, that’s radical, because it means that the opinions of important and powerful people are worthless if they conflict with reality. So central is this idea to science that it is enshrined in The Royal Society’s motto: “Take nobody’s word for it”.

Shortly after The Royal Society was formed, Sir Isaac Newton deployed this approach in his great work The Principia, which contains his law of gravity and the foundations of what we now call classical mechanics – the tools you need to work out the forces on bridges and buildings, calculate paths of artillery shells and the stresses on aircraft wings. This was arguably the first work of modern physics.

This has become known as the scientific method, and its power can be seen in some unexpected places. During the filming of Science Britannica, I met Capt Jerry Roberts who worked at Bletchley Park during the Second World War.

Bletchley intercepted enemy messages and the captain and his colleagues were given the job of decoding them. He told me the story of his colleague, Bill Tutte, who worked on the ‘Tunny” code used by the Nazi high command to send orders to generals in the field.

Bill spent most of his time staring into space, but after just a few months, with awesome mathematical acumen he cracked the code.

In an age before computers, he did it using mathematics, logic and pencil and paper, aided by a single mistake by a German telegraph operator who sent a message twice. In the opinion of many, Tutte’s achievement was the greatest single intellectual achievement of the 20th Century, shortening the war by years and saving millions of lives on both sides.

This is what happens when genius is aided by the careful, scientific approach pioneered by Newton and others at The Royal Society. Capt Roberts and his colleagues at Bletchley are, in my view, heroes in every sense of the word.

 Bletchley Park was Britain’s main decryption establishment during World War II.

The Buckinghamshire compound is famous as the place where wartime codebreakers cracked the German Enigma code
Codebreaking machines Colossus and Bombe were the forerunners of modern computers. Mathematician Alan Turing helped create the Bombe
Historians estimate that breakthroughs at Bletchley shortened the war by two years
Bletchley Park’s computing  was so innovative
Alan Turing’s work built the foundations of computer science,programming etc. He is regarded as a true genius and founder of modern computing.

Another such genius was Nobel Prize winning phycisist Paul Dirac He was regarded by his friends and colleagues as unusual in character. Albert Einstein said of him “This balancing on the dizzying path between genius and madness is awful”  Among other discoveries, he formulated the Dirac Equation, which  predicted the existence of antimatter.

Despite its tremendous success, scientists have occasionally had a difficult relationship with the wider public. Frankenstein – the ultimate ‘scientist out of control’, has become a short-hand for things we fear.

A particularly colourful example can be found in the grim tale of George Forster, convicted of the double murder of his wife and daughter in 1803 and duly hanged.

This being the 19th Century, nobody was concerned about the hanging itself but rather illogically, the fate of Forster’s corpse caused a public outcry. It was taken directly to a nearby lecture theatre and used to demonstrate the effect of electricity on the human body.

The corpse twitched and jerked and even ‘opened an eye’ as an electric current was applied. There were reports of fainting and a particularly sensitive audience member died of shock – a wonderfully Georgian thing to do. The scientist – a visiting Italian called Giovanni Aldini – was forced to leave the country, when in fact his motives were absolutely sound. He was trying to resuscitate people using electricity.

Far from being a dangerous lunatic, he was ahead of his time. Nowadays thousands of lives are saved as hearts are regularly re-started using electrical pulses delivered by defibrillators.

Aldini’s controversial experiments were performed for a particular purpose, but not all science is carried out with a goal in mind.

Mary Shelley soon after wrote the classic gothic story Frankenstein, a cautionary tale of science out of control.

In the 19th Century, John Tyndall decided to work out why the vivid red and purple colours appeared when the sun is low, and why, for the rest of the time, the sky is blue.

He concluded that the colours of the sky are produced because light bounces off dust and water particles in the air. Blue light is more likely to bounce around than red, and so it is only when the sun is low and the light travels through more of the dust-filled air that the red light is bounced around to produce a sunset.

Tyndall was half right – we now know that it is mainly the air molecules themselves that scatter the light – but this didn’t really matter. Tyndall’s romantic curiosity led to a far more important discovery.

He decided to produce “pure” air with no particles in it, to see if the colours vanished, and he discovered that samples of meat didn’t rot in it. Here was evidence that infection and decay are caused by germs in the air – which Tyndall had inadvertently removed during his purification process. The discovery ultimately transformed the way that doctors dealt with infection and contamination.

Countless millions of lives were saved, because one curious scientist wanted to find out why the sky is blue. Today, the curiosity driven exploration of nature is still known as “blue skies research”.

Science has truly revolutionised our world. It is the basis of our economy and the foundation of our future. We must value our great heritage and continue to invest in education and science to ensure that we never lose our position as the best place in the world to do science.

SIR ISAAC NEWTON and me

One there is above all others,
Well deserves the name of Friend!
His is love beyond a brother’s,
Costly, free, and knows no end:
They who once His kindness prove,
Find it everlasting love!
—Newton.

SIR ISAAC NEWTON and me

By the V&A doorway, photo by PH Morton

Newton, unarguably the greatest scientist that ever lived. Even super-genius Albert Einstein acknowledged that Newton was the greatest scientist that ever lived. His contribution to science is so immense that he saved later scientists more than 200 years in research.

I am a self-confessed stalker of all things Newton.  I have been to Westminster Abbey, where there is a memorial to this genius.

I Want a Kirobo, My Own Kirobo

Japanese do make the cutest things. This robot is so cute……… Gwiyomi!!!! It is those big eyes. You just want to squeeze him!

I want a kirobo.

LOL

JPJhermes
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Kirobo is world’s first talking robot sent into space

Robot astronaut Kirobo is launched towards the ISS

Japan has launched the world’s first talking robot into space to serve as companion to astronaut Kochi Wakata who will begin his mission in November.

The android took off from the island of Tanegashima in an unmanned rocket also carrying supplies for crew onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Measuring 34cm (13 inches), Kirobo is due to arrive at the ISS on 9 August.

It is part of a study to see how machines can lend emotional support to people isolated over long periods.

The launch of the H-2B rocket was broadcast online by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa).

The unmanned rocket is also carrying drinking water, food, clothing and work supplies to the six permanent crew members based at the ISS.
Kirobo with developer Tomotaka Takahashi

Tomotaka Takahashi with his creation

‘Giant leap’

Kirobo’s name derives from the Japanese words for “hope” and “robot”.

The small android weighs about 1kg (2.2 pounds) and has a wide range of physical motion. Its design was inspired by the legendary animation character Astro Boy.

Kirobo has been programmed to communicate in Japanese and keep records of its conversations with Mr Wakata who will take over as commander of the ISS later this year.

In addition, it is expected to relay messages from the control room to the astronaut.

“Kirobo will remember Mr Wakata’s face so it can recognise him when they reunite up in space,” the robot’s developer, Tomotaka Takahashi said.

“I wish for this robot to function as a mediator between a person and machine, or a person and the Internet, and sometimes even between people.”

The biggest challenge was to make the android compatible with space, Mr Takahashi added.

Dozens of tests were carried out over nine months to ensure Kirobo’s reliability.

Kirobo has a twin robot on Earth called Mirata, which will monitor any problems its electronic counterpart may experience in space.

“It’s one small step for me, a giant leap for robots,” Mirata said of the mission last month.

The endeavour is a joint project between Mr Takahashi, car producer Toyota and advertising company Dentsu.

New Challenger To Dyson, The Vacuum Cleaner King

It is pretty hard to uncrown Sir James Dyson in my eyes.

My Dyson vacuum cleaner is perfect for the job it is meant to do. We have bought many vacuum cleaners over the years, some only lasted a few weeks, but my Dyson is now going for its third year and still sucking anything that come its way. Dyson is expensive compared to other vacuums but based from experience, it is worth the price.

It would be interesting to see whether Khalid Mohammed could improve the ordinary vacuum cleaner. But then again what is stopping him to do something else out of the parts of the machine. He is only constrained by his imagination. eeecckk Hope he is not encouraged too much by his jailer and be given all the elements that he make a surreptitious WMD!!! 🙁

All I want is a new improved, mean, keen vacuum machine! Really!!! 😉

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s Vacuum Challenge

Sky NewsSky News – 21 hours ago

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed's Vacuum ChallengeKhalid Sheikh Mohammed’s Vacuum Challenge

The mastermind of the 9/11 terrorist attacks may have been given an unusual mission while confined to a CIA secret prison … to redesign the humble vacuum cleaner.

A former secret service official has revealed to the AP news agency that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed asked his American jailers in Romania whether he could use his expertise in mechanical engineering to rework the household appliance.

He had endured the most brutal interrogation methods, including being forced to stay awake for 180 hours and 183 instances of waterboarding in Poland.

In that time, he had confessed to a career of atrocities.

But as his intelligence value diminished, the CIA in Romania tried to find ways to occupy him.

“We didn’t want them (CIA prisoners) to go nuts,” the former official said.

He was given assignments about his knowledge of al Qaeda, or “homework,” as CIA officers called it.

He received Snickers bars as a reward and was allowed to read the entire Harry Potter series.

But it remains unclear whether Mohammed was really interested in designing a better vacuum or had ulterior motives.

He may have been inspired by Graham Greene’s spy thriller Our Man in Havana, in which a vacuum salesman in Cuba dupes MI6 into believing his designs are military installations.

And it is a mystery how far Mohammed got with his designs.

His military lawyer, Jason Wright, said he was prohibited from discussing his client’s interest in vacuums.

“It sounds ridiculous, but answering this question, or confirming or denying the very existence of a vacuum cleaner design, a Swiffer design, or even a design for a better hand towel would apparently expose the US government and its citizens to exceptionally grave danger,” he said.

The CIA told the AP that the plans, “should they exist,” would be considered classified operational files of the CIA and therefore exempt from ever being made public.

However, the CIA did apparently succeed in keeping Mohammed sane. He appears to be in good health, according to current military records.

The secret CIA prison in Romania was closed in 2006 and he was transferred to Guantanamo Bay – most likely without his blueprints.

China and its Space Mission

China launches longest-ever manned space mission

AFPBy Sebastien Berger | AFP – 2 hours 59 minutes ago

 

The Shenzhou-10 on its launch pad in Jiuquan, in the Gobi desert, on June 3, 2013. The Shenzhou-10 -- the name means "Divine Vessel" -- was due to lift off at 0938 GMT

AFP/AFP/File – The Shenzhou-10 on its launch pad in Jiuquan, in the Gobi desert, on June 3, 2013. The Shenzhou-10 — the name means “Divine Vessel” — was due to lift off at 0938 GMT

 

Graphic fact file on China's space launch set for Tuesday
Graphic fact file on China’s space launch set for Tuesday

 

China began its longest manned space mission yet Tuesday with the launch of the Shenzhou-10, state television showed, as the country steps up an ambitious exploration programme symbolising its growing power.

The rocket ascended above the Jiuquan space centre in the Gobi Desert exactly on time at 0938 GMT, trailing a vast column of flame.

The three astronauts on board — who include Wang Yaping, 33, China’s second woman in space — saluted cameras mounted inside their capsule.

A few minutes after launch the boosters detached from the rockets, and a little later the solar panels of the Shenzhou-10 — the name means “Divine Vessel” — were deployed, to applause from mission control.

“The vessel is already in orbit,” said Zhang Youxia, the manned space programme’s chief commander. “I now announce the launch was a great success.”

The crew are due to spend 15 days in orbit, in a mission that is a crucial step towards China’s goal of building a full space station capable of housing astronauts for extended periods.

Crew member of the Shenzhou-10, Wang Yaping, during a press conference on June 10, 2013. She is China's second woman astronaut

Crew member of the Shenzhou-10, Wang Yaping, during a press conference on June 10, 2013. She is China’s second woman astronaut

President Xi Jinping, fresh from a summit with US President Barack Obama, was on hand to watch the departure.

Beijing sees the multi-billion-dollar space programme as a marker of its rising global stature and mounting technical expertise, as well as the ruling Communist Party’s success in turning around the fortunes of the once poverty-stricken nation.

The project is heavily promoted to the domestic audience, and state broadcaster CCTV began continuous coverage several hours before the launch.

Xi told the trio he had come to see them off on behalf of the Communist Party, the government, the military and “all the nationalities and people of the entire nation”.

“You make all the Chinese people feel proud. Your mission is both glorious and sacred,” he added.

Mission commander Nie Haisheng responded: “We will certainly obey orders, comply with commands, be steady and calm, work with utmost care and perfectly complete the Shenzhou-10 mission.”

State-run newspapers gave the mission blanket coverage, with stories and pictures of the astronauts on almost every front page.

Astronaut Wang will teach lessons to schoolchildren via video link from space, officials said.

“We are all students in facing the vast universe. We are looking forward to joining our young friends to learn and explore the mystical and beautiful universe,” she told a press conference on Monday.

In a profile of Wang, the official Xinhua news agency said she trained as a transport pilot in the air force and has 1,600 hours of flying experience, including dispelling clouds for the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics in 2008.

Crew members of the Shenzhou-10 attend a press conference in Jiuquan, northwest China, on June 10, 2013. The three astronauts are scheduled to spend 15 days in space

Crew members of the Shenzhou-10 attend a press conference in Jiuquan, northwest China, on June 10, 2013. The three astronauts are scheduled to spend 15 days in space

She is a major in the military and a member of the Communist Party.

“The experience of doing farm work since an early age has made her strong, and the habit of long-distance running tempered her will,” Xinhua said.

It quoted her as saying that during parachute exercises in the air force: “We girls all cried while singing an inspiring song ‘A Hero Never Dies’ on our way back after the training.”

The third crew member, senior colonel Zhang Xiaoguang, has previously tried for selection for space missions but was not picked, Xinhua said.

“If success is part of our life, so are setbacks. If those who had never failed are winners, so are those who always keep on trying,” it quoted him as saying.

The Shenzhou-10 will dock with the Tiangong-1 — “Heavenly Palace” — space laboratory, and the crew will transfer into it and carry out medical and space technology experiments.

China first sent a human into space only in 2003 and its capabilities still lag behind the US and Russia. But its programme is highly ambitious and includes plans to land a man on the moon and build a station orbiting Earth by 2020.

At the same time the US, long the leader in the field, has scaled back some of its projects, such as retiring its space shuttle fleet.

Independent space analyst Morris Jones, who is based in Sydney, Australia, told AFP it was “a very smooth and clean launch”.

“My expectation is that they will continue to grow their programme at a steady pace, so it will get larger in the next decade and they will probably mount a serious challenge to the Americans and everyone else in space.”

 

Henry Ford

Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was an American industrialist, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production.

Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was an American industrialist, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production.

Often, it is assumed that Henry Ford invented the automobile.

What he actually did was to ensure that many of middle-income Americans would be able to afford to buy an automobile.  Ford developed and manufactured reasonably priced cars for the masses, thereby revolutionising transportation and ultimately the American industry.

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“Any customer can have a car painted any colour that he wants so long as it is black.”
– Henry Ford
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“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.”
―Henry Ford

…..
Don’t find fault.  Find a remedy.
~Henry Ford

~~~
“History is more or less bunk. It’s tradition. We don’t want tradition. We want to live in the present, and the only history that is worth a tinker’s damn is the history that we make today.”
– Henry Ford (Chicago Tribune, 1916).

~~~
It is well enough that people of the nation do not understand our banking and money system, for if they did, I believe there would be a revolution before tomorrow morning.
– Henry Ford
~~~
Luck and destiny are the excuses of the world’s failures.
– Henry Ford

Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it not small jobs.
– Henry Ford
~~~

”Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right.”
– Henry Ford

Success Vs Failure

Chris, the duty supervisor at Golder Green London Undergound (Tube) Station offers his latest quote for today..always readable and enjoyabe for us commuters 🙂

Quote & Thught for the Day Curtesy of Chris of London Underground station Golders Green

Quote & Thought for the Day
Courtesy of Chris of London Underground station Golders Green

Success Vs Failure

This is the quote for the day.  Failure is not the end of things, it is just the start to something big if you heed it.

Out of the failure or failures, you will find solution if you evaluate and learn the lesson from it.  Do not give up just because it failed the first time, make it better until success is achieved.

Most successes weren’t achieve the first time!
Before anything else, preparation is the key to success.
– Alexander Graham Bell (the telephone man)

Formula for success: rise early, work hard, strike oil.
– J P Getty
🙁 oil?

I can accept failure, but I can’t accept not trying.
– Michael Jordan

Ninety-nine per cent of the failures come from people who have the habit of making excuses.
– George Washington Carver

Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom.
– George S Patton

Success is the sum of small efforts – repeated day in and day out.
– Robert Collier

Success is getting what you want, happiness is wanting what you get.
– Ingrid Bergman

Success has always been a great liar.
Nietzsche

The penalty for success is to be bored by the people who used to snub you.
– Nancy astor

“The elevator to success is out of order. You’ll have to use the stairs… one step at a time.”
-Joe Girard

The only place where success comes before work is in a dictionary.
– Vidal Sassoon

What is success? It is being able to go to bed each night with your soul at peace.
Paulo Coelho

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